Tuesday, December 26, 2006

Spatial question...need responses

Someone just posted a link to the following as a comment to one of my posts and asked for feedback. I decided to post it to all readers. Readers...please provide feedback via the comment function.

7 comments:

Joel said...

My answer is A.
In each row, superimpose the first two boxes. Whatever they have in common disappears in the third box. Whatever they do not have in common stays in the third box.

Salim said...

I agree with Joel, it's obvious that it's A, the second square on each line is our place to gather what we have in 1 and 3, what is similar in square 1 and 3 disappears in 2, and what is different in 1 and 3 stays in 2.
I have a question for you Kevin can you give me your e-mail? mine is speak7 (at) gmail.com

Anonymous said...

An obvious answer must be "A".
But if someone could ever come up with a more pertinent and ingenious answer that logically narrows down to "C", it would be simply astonishing!

Anonymous said...

That's what I got--A, by the same reasoning. Of course, I had to use Gf since I have no Gv to speak of. ;)

Cathy

Anonymous said...

I agree that it's A.

I have a different question: why would something like the above count as a "spatial" question? It seems to me that it involves more deductive reasoning - the same reasoning that would be applied across the board of numbers, pictures, etc.. - than spatial manipulation.

Chris said...

Very clever ! I was approaching it as a sequence of 9 with each of the lines moving round the center, like a clock in some unfathomably fiendish sequence. What's the term for when you look for over complicated explainations ? Anyway I've got that :)

Prabha said...

my answer is A. Add fig.1 to fig.3 to get fig.2. Any common/overlapping lines will be erased and new lines will be retained