Friday, January 15, 2021

The McGrew Model of Achievement Competence Model (MACM)--Standing on the shoulders of giants: CJSP article supplementary materials

The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM) has been  under development since the early 2000's by Dr. Kevin S. McGrew.   The work is (has) been formally presented in an invited article--"The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM)--Standing on the shoulders of giants" (McGrew, in press, 2021), for a forthcoming special issue on motivation in the Canadian Journal of School Psychology). 

Due to the page length constraints of the journal, significant background and explanatory information could not be presented in the article.  Thus, I have "off-loaded" this material for supplementary viewing via on-line PPT slide shows and downloadable PDF files.

Five MACM PPT modules have been posted at SlideShare and can be viewed and downloaded from that site.  For those who would prefer to directly download PDF versions of the PPT modules from one page...here it is.  Below are the titles of the five modules and associated download links.  In addition, the paper includes, in a table footnote, definitions for 16 self-regulatory constructs from a recent article by Sitzman and Ely (2011).  That PDF file is also available from download below.

Enjoy.



The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM)

The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM) Part E: Crossing the Rubicon Commitment Pathway Model to Learning

 

The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM) is a series of slide modules.  By clicking on the link you can view the slides at SlideShare.  This is the fifth and final (Part E) in the series.  This one is brief...only 11 slides.  Crossing the Rubicon Commitment Pathway Model to Learning.  There will be a total of five modules.  The modules will serve as supplemental materials to "The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM)--Standing on the shoulders of giants" (McGrew, in press, 2021 - in a forthcoming special issue on motivation in the Canadian Journal of School Psychology)



You should be able to access the prior modules (A-C) from the link above.

Click here for prior "beyond IQ" labeled posts at this blog.

12th Edition of the AAIDD Manual Now Available!



 

 

Intellectual Disability: Definition, Diagnosis, Classification, and Systems of Supports, 12th Edition, has just been published and can be purchased from our bookstore.

All professionals in the field need this important reference book, which integrates the findings and developments of the last 10 years in a systematic approach to diagnosis, optional subgroup classification, and planning of systems of supports for people with ID.

In addition, the 12th edition examines the construct of age of onset as a criterion in diagnosis and presents the operational definition in a way that will be critically important to professionals in the field.

Buy your copy now in the AAIDD Bookstore!

 

To explore our other titles, visit our online bookstore by clicking here.

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Tuesday, January 12, 2021

NYTimes: When an I.Q. Score Is a Death Sentence

When an I.Q. Score Is a Death Sentence
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/11/opinion/death-penalty-mental-disability.html?referringSource=articleShare

Keeping Creativity under Control: Contributions of Attention Control and Fluid Intelligence to Divergent Thinking: Creativity Research Journal: Vol 0, No 0

 Keeping Creativity under Control: Contributions of Attention Control and Fluid Intelligence to Divergent Thinking: Creativity Research Journal: Vol 0, No 0 
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10400419.2020.1855906

More research implicating attentional control (AC) as a key cognitive process.

Monday, January 11, 2021

Childhood self-control forecasts the pace of midlife aging and preparedness for old age

Childhood self-control forecasts the pace of midlife aging and preparedness for old age
https://flip.it/r_Mni1


The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM): Part D-Volition and Self-Regulated Learning Domains

 The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM) is a series of slide modules.  By clicking on the link you can view the slides at SlideShare.  This is the fourth (Part D) in the series--Volition and Self-regulated Learning Domains described..  There will be a total of five modules.  The modules will serve as supplemental materials to "The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM)--Standing on the shoulders of giants" (McGrew, in press, 2021 - in a forthcoming special issue on motivation in the Canadian Journal of School Psychology)



You should be able to access the prior modules (A-C) from the link above.

Click here for prior "beyond IQ" labeled posts at this blog.

Wednesday, January 06, 2021

The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM) Part B: An overview of the MACM model

The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM) is a series of slide modules.  By clicking on the link you can view the slides at SlideShare.  This is the second (Part B) in the series--An overview of the model.  There will be a total of five modules.  The modules will serve as supplemental materials to "The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM)--Standing on the shoulders of giants" (McGrew, in press, 2021 - in a forthcoming special issue on motivation in the Canadian Journal of School Psychology)

Click here for first of the series (Part A:  Introduction and Background)

Click here for prior "beyond IQ" labeled posts at this blog.

Monday, January 04, 2021

The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM): Part A - Introduction to module series

The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM) is a series of slide modules.  By clicking on the link you can view the slides at SlideShare.  This is the first (Part A) in the series. The modules will serve as supplemental materials to "The Model of Achievement Competence Motivation (MACM)--Standing on the shoulders of giants" (McGrew, in press, 2021 - in a forthcoming special issue on motivation in the Canadian Journal of School Psychology)



Click here for prior "beyond IQ" labeled posts at this blog.




Friday, December 25, 2020

Toward a Science of Effective Cognitive Training - Claire R. Smid, Julia Karbach, Nikolaus Steinbeis, 2020

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0963721420951599


******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
******************************************************

Thursday, December 24, 2020

Be a hot or cool head.....it doesn't matter 😉



******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
******************************************************

Tuesday, December 22, 2020

Where Does Creativity Come from? What Is Creativity? Where Is Creativity Going in Giftedness? | SpringerLink

Where Does Creativity Come from? What Is Creativity? Where Is Creativity Going in Giftedness? | SpringerLink
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-56869-6_5

******************************************
Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
******************************************

Sunday, December 20, 2020

Testing Our Children When the World Shuts Down: Analyzing Recommendations for Adapted Tele-Assessment during COVID-19 - Shelley Kathleen Krach, Tracy L. Paskiewicz, Malaya M. Monk, 2020

Testing Our Children When the World Shuts Down: Analyzing Recommendations for Adapted Tele-Assessment during COVID-19 - Shelley Kathleen Krach, Tracy L. Paskiewicz, Malaya M. Monk, 2020 
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0734282920962839

Abstract
In 2017, the National Association of School Psychologists described tele-assessment as the least researched area of telehealth. This became problematic in 2020 when COVID-19 curtailed the administration of face-to-face assessments. Publishers began to offer computer-adapted tele-assessment methods for tests that had only previously been administered in person. Recommendations for adapted tele-assessment practice had to be developed with little empirical data. The current study analyzed recommendations from entities including professional organizations, test publishers, and governmental offices. The samples for each were small, but the findings were noteworthy. Test publishers were unanimous in recommending the use of their face-to-face assessments through adapted tele-assessment methods (either with or without caution). Governmental agencies were more likely to recommend not using adapted tele-assessment methods or to use these methods with caution. Finally, professional organizations were almost unanimous in their recommendations to use adapted tele-assessment but to do so with caution. In addition to deviations in the types of recommendations provided, entities varied in how the information was distributed. About one-fifth (23.5%) of all entities surveyed provided no recommendations at all. About 45% of the remaining entities provided recommendations on their Web sites. The rest provided information through shared documents, online toolkits, peer-reviewed journals, and emails. Implications for the field of psychology's future crisis management planning are discussed in response to these findings.
Keywords tele-assessmentvaliditybest practicestechnologyassessmentCOVID-19crisisprogram evaluatio