Monday, May 30, 2016

Is Intelligence Hereditary?



Is Intelligence Hereditary?

Scientists have investigated this question for more than a century, and the answer is clear: the differences between people on intelligence tests are substantially the…

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Journal of Cognitive Psychology Best Paper Award 2015



Journal of Cognitive Psychology Best Paper Award 2015

Routledge is proud to announce the winner of the Journal of Cognitive Psychology Best Paper Award 2015. The winning paper was 'Using the process…

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Sunday, May 29, 2016

Research Byte: Motor cortex excitability in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A systematic review and meta-analysis via BrowZine

Motor cortex excitability in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A systematic review and meta-analysis
Dutra, T.G.; Baltar, A.; Monte-Silva, K.K.
Research in Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 56 – 2016: 1 - 9

10.1016/j.ridd.2016.01.022

University of Minnesota Users:
http://login.ezproxy.lib.umn.edu/login?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0891422216300300

Non-University of Minnesota Users: (Full text may not be available)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0891422216300300

Accessed with BrowZine, supported by University of Minnesota.

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Research Byte: The Human Brainnetome Atlas: A New Brain Atlas Based on Connectional Architecture.



The Human Brainnetome Atlas: A New Brain Atlas Based on Connectional Architecture.

2016 May 26. pii: bhw157. [Epub ahead of print] 1Brainnetome Center. • 2Brainnetome Center National Laboratory of…

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Wednesday, May 25, 2016

$1.2 Billion Human Brain Project That Blows Your Mind



$1.2 Billion Human Brain Project That Blows Your Mind

As a society living in a 21st century, we have just begun to realize how little do we know about our brain. We desperately need to understand how…

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Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Research Byte: Short-term memory for faces is related to general intelligence: A possible new CHC narrow ability taxonomy candidate?

Click on image to enlarge.

Available online 21 May 2016

Highlights

Short-term memory for faces correlated positively with several stratum II factors.
Short-term memory for faces was associated with general intelligence at .34.
Short-term memory for faces should not be considered “special” (i.e., independent of g).
Prosopagnosia may be best characterised as a learning disability.

Abstract

The results associated with a small number of investigations suggest that individual differences in memory for faces, as measured by the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT), are independent of intelligence. Consequently, memory for faces has been suggested to be a special construct, unlike other cognitive abilities. However, previous investigations have measured intelligence with only one or two subtests. Additionally, the sample sizes upon which previous investigations were based were relatively small (N = 45 to 80). Consequently, in this investigation, a battery of eight cognitive ability tests and the CFMT were administered to a relatively large number of participants (N = 211). Based on a correlated-factor model, memory for faces was found to be correlated positively with fluid intelligence (.29), short-term memory (.23) and lexical knowledge ability (.19). Additionally, based on a higher-order model, memory for faces was found to be associated with g at .34. The results are interpreted to suggest that memory for faces, as measured by the CFMT, may be characterised as a relatively typical narrow cognitive ability within the Cattell–Horn–Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence, rather than a special ability (i.e., independent of other abilities). Future research with a greater diversity in the measurement of face recognition ability is encouraged (e.g., long-term memory), as the CFMT is a measure of short-term face memory ability.

Keywords

  • Intelligence;
  • CHC theory;
  • Face identity recognition;
  • Prosopagnosia

Saturday, May 21, 2016

How the brain consolidates memory during deep sleep


Dr. Jon Lieff is always producing well documented and insightful information at his blog

How the brain consolidates memory during deep sleep

Research strongly suggests that sleep, which constitutes about a third of our lives, is crucial for learning and forming long-term memories. But…

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Monday, May 16, 2016

New Glossary of Brain Science Terms



New Glossary of Brain Science Terms

Which part of the brain is involved in consciousness and emotion…and what exactly is the limbic system anyway? Our latest publication—A Glossary of Key Brain…

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Thursday, May 12, 2016

"Intelligent" intelligence testing with the WJ IV Tests of Cognitive Ability #6: Within-Gc assessment tree


Here is the second WJ IV Within-CHC Assessment Tree--this time for Gc.  See prior post where I explain the basis of these groupings (example is for Gf-tree) and what the various arrows and fonts designate.   I am now also including a tabular form of the information.  This is part of my "Intelligent intelligence testing with the WJ IV Tests of Cognitive Abilities" series.

A PDF copy, which is quite clean, can be downloaded here.

Relevant broad and narrow definitions are below

Comprehension-knowledge (Gc):  The depth and breadth of declarative and procedural knowledge and skills valued by one’s culture. Comprehension of language, words, and general knowledge developed through experience, learning and acculturation.

  • General (verbal) information (K0): The breadth and depth of knowledge that one’s culture deems essential, practical, or worthwhile for most everyone to know.
  • Language development (LD): The general understanding of spoken language at the level of words, idioms, and sentences.  An intermediate factor between broad Gc and other narrow Gc abilities.  It usually represents a number of narrow language abilities working together in concert—therefore it is not likely a unique ability. 
  •  Lexical knowledge (VL): The knowledge of the word definitions and the concepts that underlie them. Vocabulary knowledge.
  • Listening ability (LS): The ability to understand speech, starting with comprehending single words and increasing to long complex verbal statements. 
Domain-specific knowledge (Gkn): The depth, breadth, and mastery of specialized declarative and procedural knowledge typically acquired through one’s career, hobby, or other passionate interest. The Gkn domain is likely to contain more narrow abilities than are currently listed in the CHC model.  
  • Knowledge of culture (K2): The range of knowledge about the humanities (e.g., philosophy, religion, history, literature, music, and art).

Click on images to enlarge and for clearer image.




I, Kevin McGrew, am solely responsible for this content.  The information presented here (and in this series) does not necessarily reflect the views of my WJ IV coauthors or that of the publisher of the WJ IV (HMH).


"Intelligent" intelligence testing with the WJ IV Tests of Cognitive Ability #2.5: What is Kaufman's "intelligent" intelligence testing?



This should have been one of the first posts in my "intelligent" testing series.  Better late than never.  Alan Kaufman's 1979 "Intelligent intelligence testing with the WISC-R" had a profound impcat on my intelligence testing practices when I was a practicing school psychologist and in many ways influenced my career to move into applied psychometrics, scholarship, etc.  If you prefer a PDF copy, with one slide per page, it can be found here.


Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Research Byte: Improving time processing ability in children with disabilities

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An interesting study demonstrating that it may be possible to improve the time processing abilities of children with various disabilities. Given that time processing abilities have been implicated in certain key cognitive functions (working memory, attentional control, executive functions) this study is intriguing. I am particularly interested in learning more about the time processing ability measures and the potential to use them in future intelligence test batteries...as well as where such temporal abilities fit in the CHC model of cognitive abilities.