Saturday, July 04, 2020

Distinct rhythmic abilities align with phonological awareness and rapid naming in school-age children | SpringerLink




https://link-springer-com.ezp3.lib.umn.edu/article/10.1007/s10339-020-00984-6


Abstract

Difficulty in performing rhythmic tasks often co-occurs with literacy difficulties. Motivated by evidence showing that people can vary in their performance across different rhythmic tasks, we asked whether two rhythmic skills identified as distinct in school-age children and young adults would reveal similar or different relationships with two literacy skills known to be important for successful reading development. We addressed our question by focusing on 55 typically developing children (ages 5–8). Results show that drumming to a beat predicted the variability of rapid naming but not of phonological awareness, whereas tapping rhythmic patterns predicted phonological awareness, but not rapid naming. Our finding suggests that rhythmic interventions can be tailored to address PA and RAN deficits specifically in reading disabled children.



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Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
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Friday, July 03, 2020

Effects of spatial training on mathematics in first and sixth grade children. - PsycNET

 Effects of spatial training on mathematics in first and sixth grade children. - PsycNET 
https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2020-47006-001

Abstract
A pretest-training-posttest design assessed whether training to improve spatial skills also improved mathematics performance in elementary-aged children. First grade students (mean age = 7 years, n = 134) and sixth grade students (mean age = 12 years, n = 124) completed training in 1 of 2 spatial skills—spatial visualization or form perception/VSWM—or in a nonspatial control condition that featured language arts training. Spatial training led to better overall mathematics performance in both grades, and the gains were significantly greater than for language arts training. The same effects were found regardless of spatial training type, or the type of mathematics tested. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

In-class attention, spatial ability, and mathematics anxiety predict across-grade gains in adolescents’ mathematics achievement. - PsycNET


 In-class attention, spatial ability, and mathematics anxiety predict across-grade gains in adolescents' mathematics achievement. - PsycNET 
https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2020-47007-001

Geary, D. C., Hoard, M. K., Nugent, L., & Scofield, J. E. (2020). In-class attention, spatial ability, and mathematics anxiety predict across-grade gains in adolescents' mathematics achievement. Journal of Educational Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/edu0000487

Abstract
Identifying meaningful cognitive and noncognitive predictors of mathematical competence is critical for developing targeted interventions for students struggling with mathematics. Here, 317 students' short-term verbal memory, verbal and visuospatial working memory, complex spatial abilities, intelligence, and mathematics attitudes and anxiety were assessed, and their teachers reported on their attentive behavior in 7th-grade mathematics classrooms. Bayesian regression models revealed that complex spatial abilities and in-class attention were the most plausible predictors of 7th-grade mathematics, but not word reading achievement, controlling for prior mathematics achievement. These results were confirmed with multilevel models that revealed interactions between these factors and prior achievement. The largest gains were among students with strong mathematical competencies in 6th grade, and average or better in-class attention in 7th grade as well as above average spatial abilities. High mathematics anxiety was associated with lower attention and through this indirectly influenced achievement gains. These results have implications for how to best target interventions for students at risk for long-term difficulties with mathematics. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Early Detection of Dyslexia Risk: Development of Brief, Teacher-Administered Screens - Jack M. Fletcher, David J. Francis, Barbara R. Foorman, Christopher Schatschneider,

Early Detection of Dyslexia Risk: Development of Brief, Teacher-Administered Screens - Jack M. Fletcher, David J. Francis, Barbara R. Foorman, Christopher Schatschneider,
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0731948720931870

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
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Saturday, June 20, 2020

On the nonlinear association between intelligence and openness: Not much of an effect beyond an average IQ - ScienceDirect

 On the nonlinear association between intelligence and openness: Not much of an effect beyond an average IQ - ScienceDirect 
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0191886920303585

Abstract
The linear association between intelligence and openness has been estimated at r ≈ 0.20 to 0.30. However, little research has examined the possibility of a nonlinear effect between the two dimensions. Consequently, task-based intelligence and self-reported openness data were collected from 371 participants (UK community sample). We found that the association was nonlinear, i.e., the positive effect was no longer observed beyond an IQ of ≈ 105. Furthermore, across the 10 openness items, four evidenced positive, linear effects with intelligence, all of which were epistemic openness items. By comparison, several experiential openness items showed inverted U-shaped effects. It is concluded that, beyond relatively low to moderate levels of intelligence, general intelligence may be unrelated to global openness, especially if need for cognition is considered distinct from openness.

Why grandiose narcissists care so much about intelligence?....hmm..sound like anyone we know?

Current Directions in Psychological Science - Volume 29, Number 3, Jun 01, 2020 
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0963721420917152

Abstract 

Grandiose narcissists typically pursue agentic goals, such as social status, competence, and autonomy. We argue that because high intelligence is a key asset for the attainment of such agentic goals, the concept of intelligence should play a prominent role in grandiose narcissists' self-regulation and social behavior. We review the relevant literature and report evidence in support of this claim. Grandiose narcissists consider intelligence to be an important resource that leads to benefits across life domains, they tend to maintain and defend illusory positive intellectual self-views, and they are extremely motivated to appear intelligent to other people. Thus, even though grandiose narcissism is essentially unrelated to objectively assessed intelligence, intelligence nevertheless plays an important role in the way grandiose narcissists think, feel, and behave. We discuss potential implications for social relationships and point toward avenues for future research.

Keywords agency, grandiose narcissism, intelligence, narcissism


Conclusion

Maintaining feelings of competence, autonomy, and con-trol is an important goal for grandiose narcissists. Because intelligence is helpful for the attainment of these goals, it plays a significant role in the way narcissists' think, feel, and behave. Narcissists consider intelligence to be an important asset that leads to benefits in the social world. They are highly motivated to maintain a grandiose self-view with regard to intelligence, which enables them to feel good; they defend this self-view against criticism and want to appear smart to other peo-ple. We hope that by taking narcissists' preoccupation with the concept of intelligence into account, research-ers, practitioners, and laypersons might be able to better understand why narcissistic bosses, ex-lovers, or presi-dents behave the way they do..

Friday, June 19, 2020

Comparing and combining retrieval practice and concept mapping. - PsycNET

File under Gr intervention as per CHC taxonomy

 Comparing and combining retrieval practice and concept mapping. - PsycNET 
https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2020-43443-001

Citation
O'Day, G. M., & Karpicke, J. D. (2020). Comparing and combining retrieval practice and concept mapping. Journal of Educational Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/edu0000486

Abstract
Retrieval practice enhances the learning of educational materials, and prior work has shown that practicing retrieval can enhance learning as much as or more than creating concept maps. Few studies have combined retrieval practice with other learning activities, and no prior work has explored whether concept mapping and retrieval practice might produce especially robust effects when the two activities are combined. In two experiments, students studied educational texts and practiced retrieval (by freely recalling the texts), created concept maps, or completed both activities. In the combined-activity condition, students studied and created concept maps prior to practicing retrieval. On a 1-week delayed assessment, practicing retrieval enhanced learning relative to creating concept maps. Surprisingly, combining concept mapping and retrieval practice failed to produce any benefit over retrieval practice without concept mapping, even though students in the combined condition spent substantially more time engaged with the materials than did students in single-activity conditions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Saturday, June 13, 2020

Sex differences in inductive reasoning: A research synthesis using meta-analytic techniques - ScienceDirect

Abstract

Meta-analyses concerning sex differences in measures of fluid ability have been limited to discussions of sex differences in the Raven's Progressive Matrices, a measure of inductive reasoning. This study synthesized data concerning sex differences on several different types of inductive reasoning tests in order to assess the evidence for an overall sex difference in manifest scores, as well as whether the magnitude of the sex difference may vary depending on certain test characteristics such as stimuli and item type. Meta-analytic techniques were used to summarize data concerning sex differences in inductive reasoning from 98 studies reporting data from 96,957 adults with mean ages 18 to 64 years. The overall summary effect size was g = +0.13 (range −0.54 to +0.68), however there was significant variation in the magnitude, and in some cases direction, of the effect size in measures of inductive reasoning. Some implications of this variation in the effect size of the sex difference across tests are discussed in light of theoretical interpretations and practical uses.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0191886920301483


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Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
******************************************************

Friday, June 12, 2020

COVID-19 and digital inequalities: Reciprocal impacts and mitigation strategies - ScienceDirect

Highlights


The COVID-19 pandemic is increasing digital inequalities.

Digital inequalities are increasing the vulnerability to the COVID-19 virus and to the consequences of the crisis.

The impact of digital inequalities on COVID-19 vulnerability should be central in the governmental responses.

Actionability-focused mitigation strategies targeting the individuals and the messages are proposed.


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563220301771 
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563220301771?via%3Dihub

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
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Friday, June 05, 2020

Researchers study alternative training tools designed to improve Soldier performance — Interactive Metronome

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-06/uarl-rsa060420.php


******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
******************************************************