Tuesday, July 29, 2014

ADHD as a brain network disorder: More evidence




It is becoming clear that ADHD is likely related to dysfunctional interactions between certain brain networks (click here for prior ADHD posts). The following two studies add to this growing literature on the importance of brain network connectivity.

This research is also consistent with my previously posted white-paper on brain networks, temporal processing (brain clock) and cognitive efficiency processing with a strong influence of white matter integrity (paper is written around explaining the efficacy of the IM intervention but can also be viewed as a three level explanation of how brain networks influence working memory, attentional control, and executive functioning).

Click on images to enlarge.














- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Quotes to note: Importance of high quality psychological testing to psychologists




I just read this nice statement at the begging of the following article by Robert J. Ivnik, Ph.D., ABPP Professor of Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

The only professional services that are uniquely psychology's are testing-based assessments. Every other service that psychology offers can be obtained from other professions. In light of testing's central importance to our profession, and considering the number of years that psychologists have been practicing, we assure that our tests are scientifically sound and have been validated for the purposes to which they are put (e.g., research proves that our tests make accurate predictions). Correct? After all, in today's health care environment would any profession knowingly expose its core service to potential attack?

Although testing-based assessments are psychology's defining feature, they may also be our profession's Achilles' heel. Unfortunately, the manner in which many tests have been developed, standardized, normed, and validated may be most kindly described as ‘‘varied'' when it comes to scientific rigor. The science behind some of psychology's older and commercially successful tests tends to be stronger when some of the profit accrued by their sale is devoted to improving the tests. Lacking similar financial resources, many other tests have simply not been developed or validated very well
.

Click on image to enlarge.


- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Fwd: [ABA-3D] Webinar Announcement



Suspects/Offenders' Issues Series:

Alternatives to Incarceration for Criminal Offenders with Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities

 

August 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m. EST

Jessica S. Oppenheim, Esq.

Director of the Criminal Justice Advocacy Program of The Arc of New Jersey


Criminal Offenders with developmental and intellectual disabilities (I/DD) present unique challenges to the criminal justice system seeking to investigate and prosecute crime as well as to the social service system seeking to serve and assist this vulnerable population. Such individuals make up at least 9 – 10% of the prison population and some studies tell us that they may comprise as much as 50% of adult and juvenile offender populations. It is unquestioned that individuals with I/DD face distinct disadvantages in the system, resulting in convictions for more serious offenses and more prison time.

 

The Criminal Justice Advocacy Program (CJAP) of The Arc of NJ seeks to overcome these disadvantages, while still ensuring that offenders take responsibility for criminal behavior, by arranging specific interventions that provide alternatives to incarceration through offender-specific Personalized Justice Plans. The CJAP also acts as a clearinghouse of information between the criminal justice and social service system in provide training and communication between the two systems. This webinar will review the obstacles and disadvantages faced by this population and provide an overview of the CJAP.  Register here

The Arc's National Center on Criminal

Justice & Disability (NCCJD)

Webinar Series

MISSIONNCCJD will become the national focal point for the collection and dissemination of resources and serve as a bridge between justice and I/DD professionals. NCCJD will pursue and promote safety, fairness and justice for all people with intellectual and developmental disabilities as suspects, offenders, victims or witnesses. For more information: http://www.thearc.org/NCCJD

Contact: Kathryn Walker, Criminal Justice Fellow    Phone: 202.534.3700    Email: NCCJDInfo@thearc.org

 

 

 

 

 

    Kathryn J. Walker, J.D., M.P.H.

Criminal Justice Fellow

The Arc 

1825 K Street NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20036

Phone:  202.600.3491 | Toll free: 800.433.5255

Fax: 202.534.3731

Email: kwalker@thearc.org

            www.thearc.org/NCCJD

Follow us online at:   

 

 

 

You can help build The Arc by making a secure, online contribution by visiting www.thearc.org/donate. Thank you for supporting the work of The Arc.

 

Article: A meta-analysis of sex differences in human brain structure


A meta-analysis of sex differences in human brain structure
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763413003011

Sent via Flipboard



Article: Dementia 'predicted by slow walking speed and memory problems'


Dementia 'predicted by slow walking speed and memory problems'
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/280237.php

Sent via Flipboard



Saturday, July 26, 2014

More on Greenspan's model of personal competence: Relationship between IQ and social, practical, and conceptual abilities

I am pleased to see that, after a relatively long draught in published research, someone is again investigating the relations between general intelligence, and the primary domains of adaptive behavior, in models (that when examined closely) that are investigating aspects of Greenspan's' model of personal competence. The title, abstract, and key figure from this new research follow. The article can be read here. Kudos to these researchers

Click on images to enlarge





My primary criticism of this study is that it completely ignores the primary foundation research in this area that occurred between 1990 and 2000, some of which are the primary research studies cited in the AAIDD manuals to support the domains of practical, conceptual and social competence (Greenspan's model). I have provided a list of that research, and results from the most prominent article from that group of researchers, below.












Yes, my name is all over these MIA studies (in the current featured article) so some could see my comments as academic sour grapes for being overlooked. But I see their omission as a lack of scholarly rigor by the researchers and the journal who published the current article. All of the MIA studies can be found at the MindHub--scroll down until you see the list of studies shown above. Then click away and download and read. It would have been nice if the new study results would have been integrated with the extant personal competence research literature.

In the final analysis I am pleased that someone is conducting much needed research on these constructs given the pivotal role they play in the definition and assessment of MR/ID.


- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Friday, July 25, 2014

The new WJ IV: Introductory webinar and author video interviews

The publisher of the new WJ IV Battery just posted an on-line video of Dr. Fred Schrank's WJ IV introduction and overview webinar and brief video interviews of the three WJ IV authors. They can be found here.

[Conflict of interest disclosure: I am one of the coauthors of the WJ IV].

I am much younger looking than my video interview suggests :)






- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Sharing To what extent does g impact on conceptual, practical and social adaptive functioning in clinically referred children? via BrowZine

To what extent does g impact on conceptual, practical and social adaptive functioning in clinically referred children?
Murray, A.; McKenzie, K.; Murray, G.
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 58 Issue 8 – 2014: 777 - 785

10.1111/jir.12092

University of Minnesota Users:
https://www.lib.umn.edu/log.phtml?url=http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jir.12092

Non-University of Minnesota Users: (Full text may not be available)
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jir.12092

Accessed with BrowZine, supported by University of Minnesota.

Sharing Who's the Best? A Relativistic View of Expertise via BrowZine

Who's the Best? A Relativistic View of Expertise
Weiss, David J.; Shanteau, James
Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 28 Issue 4 – 2014: 447 - 457

10.1002/acp.3015

University of Minnesota Users:
https://www.lib.umn.edu/log.phtml?url=http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3015

Non-University of Minnesota Users: (Full text may not be available)
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3015

Accessed with BrowZine, supported by University of Minnesota.

Sharing Effects of Music Training on Attention, Processing Speed and Cognitive Music Abilities-Findings from a Longitudinal Study via BrowZine

Effects of Music Training on Attention, Processing Speed and Cognitive Music Abilities-Findings from a Longitudinal Study
Roden, Ingo; Könen, Tanja; Bongard, Stephan; Frankenberg, Emily; Friedrich, Esther Kamala; Kreutz, Gunter
Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 28 Issue 4 – 2014: 545 - 557

10.1002/acp.3034

University of Minnesota Users:
https://www.lib.umn.edu/log.phtml?url=http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3034

Non-University of Minnesota Users: (Full text may not be available)
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3034

Accessed with BrowZine, supported by University of Minnesota.

Detteman's Laws of Individual Differences: Repost of Dec 22, 2008 post

I just learned that the link to the PDF file referenced in an old post was dead.  I just fixed it an am re-posting that original post in case others have been frustrated by the broken link.



Early in my career I ran across a tremendous tongue-in-check book chapter by Doug Detterman where he articulated Detterman's Laws of Individual Differences (click here to view--you will need to rotate in your pdf reader). Many of the laws make me laugh to this day. All serious individual difference psychologists (psychometrics, intelligence researchers, developers and users of intelligence tests) should read these from time-to-time....to regain perspective on research in this area. You can read them for yourself...but below are a few of my favorites:

Laws of statistical inertia

  • Law II. Anything which exists can be measured incorrectly
  • Law III. Incorrect measurements require intelligent application of appropriate statistics to be interpretable
  • Law IV. It can't be done.
  • Law VII. Everything is correlated with everything else.
  • Law VIII. Never factor analyze anything - this is one of my absolute favorites, esp. his further explation.....it is impossible to conduct a factor analysis correctly on data which are completely suitable......determining an acceptable rotation has never been accomplished by anyone in the history of Western Civilization..it is impossible to name factors and still have friends...
  • Law X. The less frequently used multivariate techniques...must be left to the experts.
  • Law X (corrlary 1). There are no experts in the less frequently used multivariate techniques.
  • Law XIII. The potential usefulness of any statistical technique is directly proportional to the impossibility of its correct application.

Laws of research strategy.

  • Law XV. My area is best
  • Law XVI. Always remember you are bringing religion to the heathen.
  • Law XVIII (corralary 1). Awlays use models at least ten years old.
  • Law XVIII (corralary 2). Never blame the model.

Laws of creative research interpretation

  • Law XXI. Lacking reliability and/or validity, theorize.
  • Law XXII. Having obtained reliability and/or validiy, theorize elaborately
And many others..............a classic in the field..

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Article: Unpacking the Science: How Playing Music Changes the Learning Brain




Self-Regulation Strategies for Students With Learning Disabilities [feedly]



----
Self-Regulation Strategies for Students With Learning Disabilities
// Scientific Learning - Fast ForWord Reading Program | Educational ...

Self-regulation strategies

When a student with a learning disability struggles academically, it's logical to think that the issue is related to the student's deficit in a specific ability. And while that may be true, there might be more to it. Students with learning disabilities often encounter academic difficulties, at least in part, because they don't have effective strategies for working through challenges.

One effective tool that students can use to improve academic performance, regardless of ability, is self-regulation. Self-regulation is the process by which students take charge of their own learning, monitoring their behavior and progress and making adjustments along the way to get from idea to execution. It's the transformation of thought into purposeful action. Here are several strategies teachers can introduce for use in the classroom and at home:

Setting Goals

Goal setting is an important part of self-regulation and can be foundational to other self-regulation strategies. When used effectively, the process of goal setting gives students an opportunity to observe their own behavior and pinpoint areas for improvement. It helps students identify what they need to do, lets them see how they are progressing, and motivates them to act productively.

Students should set goals for themselves that are specific and challenging, but not too hard. A goal should be quickly attainable so students can experience a sense of accomplishment and move on to tackle the next one. For example, when two students are struggling with homework, each might need to set a different goal to see improvement. The first student might identify time management as a problem and decide to cut out a leisure activity in order to achieve the goal of completing homework before dinnertime each day that week. The second student might realize that he needs to bring his class notes home from school every day so he has the information he needs to achieve his goal of completing all of his homework assignments for the week.

Self-Monitoring

Students self-monitor by asking themselves whether they have engaged in a specific, desired behavior. Building on the goal-setting examples above, our students might ask themselves, Am I using my time in the right way to complete my homework by dinnertime?Or, Did I put all of my homework assignments in my backpack to take home?Students may find it helpful to self-monitor for behaviors like paying attention, staying on task, following strategy steps, and meeting performance expectations such as completing all homework problems or spelling 8 of 10 spelling words correctly.

Self-Instruction

Self-instruction is also sometimes called "self-talk" and is part of normal development for many younger children. It can also be quite powerful when used by students of any age to purposefully self-regulate and direct learning behavior. For example, a student who is struggling to comprehend a challenging text might think, I need to look up the definitions of these unfamiliar words and read this page again.

Students can use self-talk to remind themselves to focus their attention, to take positive steps when faced with difficulties, to reinforce positive behaviors, and more. Teachers can model effective self-talk, but should allow each student to create and use her own statements. A little advance planning can be helpful here. Coming up with the right phrase in the heat of the moment – when focus has been lost or frustrations are running high – is unlikely to help. But taking a little time to write out some useful statements before starting a new project or beginning a homework assignment can enable students get themselves out of a tight spot.

Self-Reinforcement

Self-reinforcement occurs when a student chooses a motivating reward and then awards it to himself when he achieves a milestone. Self-reinforcement can be used over shorter and longer timeframes and can tie into goals. Our student who has identified time-management as an issue, for example, might decide, I can go to the movies on Sunday because I finished all of my homework before dinnertime every night this week.

Self-reinforcement can also work well in the classroom. Teachers and students can select rewards together and teachers can let students know how to earn them. Once a student has met the criteria for a reward, she can award it to herself – say, by selecting a sticker for her journal after completing the day's writing assignment and getting her teacher's approval.

Purposeful Learning

Becoming a better self-regulator isn't a panacea for academic difficulties, but students with learning disabilities who learn effective self-regulation strategies will have some advantages. They will have tools in their toolbox that they can try out in a variety of situations before seeking outside help, or when help is not immediately available. They will understand how their behavior influences their results. And they will understand that their learning is a purposeful, active process in which they play the leading role.

Best of all, these self-regulation strategies can benefit all learners, not just those who are struggling. Why not give them a try?

References:

Reid, R., Lienemann, T.O., & Hagaman, J.L. (2013). Strategy Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities,(2nd ed.) .New York: Guilford Press.

Self-Regulation. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://cehs.unl.edu/csi/self.shtml



Article: Concerto - Ravens Progressive Matrices test project




Monday, July 21, 2014

Sharing Reassessing Models of Basal Ganglia Function and Dysfunction via BrowZine

Reassessing Models of Basal Ganglia Function and Dysfunction
Nelson, Alexandra B.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.
Annual Review of Neuroscience, Vol. 37 Issue 1 – 2013: 117 - 135

10.1146/annurev-neuro-071013-013916

University of Minnesota Users:
https://www.lib.umn.edu/log.phtml?url=http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-neuro-071013-013916

Non-University of Minnesota Users: (Full text may not be available)
http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-neuro-071013-013916

Accessed with BrowZine, supported by University of Minnesota.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Excellent article on self-control in children

This is an excellent overview article re: the construct of self-control. It also compares and contrasts self-control research with the self-regulatory learning strategy research literature. Click on images to enlarge.












- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Sharing Solving the puzzle of why Finns have the highest IQ, but one of the lowest number of Nobel prizes in Europe via BrowZine

Solving the puzzle of why Finns have the highest IQ, but one of the lowest number of Nobel prizes in Europe
Dutton, Edward; te Nijenhuis, Jan; Roivainen, Eka
Intelligence, Vol. 46 – 2014: 192 - 202

10.1016/j.intell.2014.06.006

University of Minnesota Users:
https://www.lib.umn.edu/log.phtml?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289614000920

Non-University of Minnesota Users: (Full text may not be available)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289614000920

Accessed with BrowZine, supported by University of Minnesota.

Article: What Predicts Success? It's Not Your IQ

This article is very consistent with IQ's Corner's Beyond IQ and Model of Academic Competence and Motivation (MCACM).  See info at this link   http://www.iqscorner.com/search/label/Beyond%20IQ



Article: Cognitive profiles are rarely flat.

Another awesome and Gv brilliant post from Joel Schneider
Cognitive profiles are rarely flat.
http://assessingpsyche.wordpress.com/2014/07/17/cognitive-profiles-are-rarely-flat/

Sent via Flipboard



Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Special issue of Intelligence on expertise: TOC

Below are images of the TOC for the special issue of Intelligence on expertise. Click in images to enlarge.






- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Introduction to the intelligence special issue on the development of expertise: is ability necessary? [feedly]

Excellent issue with variety of opinions, based on research and theory, on expertise development.

----
Introduction to the intelligence special issue on the development of expertise: is ability necessary?
// INTELLIGENCE - Web of Knowledge

Title: Introduction to the intelligence special issue on the development of expertise: is ability necessary?
Author(s): Detterman, Douglas K.
Source: INTELLIGENCE, 45: 1-5 JUL-AUG 2014
IDS#: AJ6BD. ISSN: 0160-2896
----

Shared via my feedly reader



A Meta-Analysis of Differences in IQ Profiles Between Individuals with Asperger's Disorder and High-Functioning Autism [feedly]



----
A Meta-Analysis of Differences in IQ Profiles Between Individuals with Asperger's Disorder and High-Functioning Autism
// JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS - Web of Knowledge

Title: A Meta-Analysis of Differences in IQ Profiles Between Individuals with Asperger's Disorder and High-Functioning Autism
Author(s): Chiang, Hsu-Min; Tsai, Luke Y.; Cheung, Ying Kuen; et al.
Source: JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 44 (7): 1577-1596 JUL 2014
IDS#: AJ5TY. ISSN: 0162-3257
----

Shared via my feedly reader



In Search of "Anything That Would Help": Parent Perspectives on Emerging Neurotechnologies [feedly]



----
In Search of "Anything That Would Help": Parent Perspectives on Emerging Neurotechnologies
// JOURNAL OF ATTENTION DISORDERS - Web of Knowledge

Title: In Search of "Anything That Would Help": Parent Perspectives on Emerging Neurotechnologies
Author(s): Borgelt, Emily L.; Buchman, Daniel Z.; Weiss, Margaret; et al.
Source: JOURNAL OF ATTENTION DISORDERS, 18 (5): 395-401 JUL 2014
IDS#: AJ5GD. ISSN: 1087-0547
----

Shared via my feedly reader



******************************************************