Saturday, March 25, 2017

Sharing A Synthesis of the Effects of Correctional Education on the Academic Outcomes of Incarcerated Adults via BrowZine

A Synthesis of the Effects of Correctional Education on the Academic Outcomes of Incarcerated Adults
Reed, Deborah K.
Educational Psychology Review: Vol. 27 Issue 3 – 2015: 537 - 558

10.1007/s10648-014-9289-8

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Sharing Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Learners: The Need for Continued Advocacy via BrowZine

Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Learners: The Need for Continued Advocacy
Hoover, John J.; deBettencourt, Laurie U.
Exceptionality: Articles in press



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Thursday, March 23, 2017

The origins of the current CHC definitions: Where is the CHC definition birth certificate?



The historical development of the CHC model of intelligence has been documented by McGrew (2005) and Schneider and McGrew (2012) and summarized by Kaufman and colleagues (Kaufman, 2009; Kaufman, Raiford & Coalson, 2016).  An unexplained crucial, yet missing piece of the CHC story, is the origin of the original CHC broad and narrow ability definitions.  The CHC ability definition birth certificate, until now, has not been located.  To fend off possible CHC “birther” controversies, I will now set the record straight regarding the heritage of the past and current CHC definitions.

Given the involvement of both John Horn and Jack Carroll in revisions of the WJ-R and WJ III, which was the impetus for the combined CHC theory, it is not surprising that the relations between the “official” CHC ability definitions and the WJ tests were “reciprocal in nature, with changes in one driving changes in the other” (Kaufman et al., 2016, p. 253).  Furthermore, “the WJ IV represents the first revision in which none of the original CHC theorists was alive at the time of publication, producing and imbalance in this reciprocal relationship, with the WJ IV manuals now serving as the official source for the latest CHC theory and model of cognitive abilities (J. Schneider, personal communication, March 15, 2015)” (Kaufman et al., 2016; p. 253).  Kaufman et al. noted that with the development of subsequent non-WJ CHC assessment and interpretation frameworks (e.g., Flanagan and colleagues cross-battery assessment; Miller’s integrated school neuropsychology/CHC assessment model), confusion has crept into what represents the authoritative “official” and “unofficial” definitions and sources.  


In Schneider & McGrew (2012), the incestuous nature of the evolution of the CHC definitions continued by building primarily on the McGrew (2005) definitions, which in turn were reflected in the 2001 WJ III manuals, which in turn drew from McGrew (1997).   It is time to divorce the official CHC definitions from the WJ series and authors (particularly myself, Kevin McGrew). 

However, the CHC birth certificate question is still present.  Did the CHC definitions magically appear?  After the Cattell-Horn and Carroll models were first married by McGrew (1997), were the definitions the result of some form of immaculate conception?  Did  McGrew (1997) develop them unilaterally?  The original CHC definitions were presented in McGrew’s (1997) chapter where the individual tests from all major intelligence batteries where first classified as per the first integration of the Cattell-Horn and Carroll models of cognitive abilities (then called a “proposed synthesized Carrell and Horn-Cattell Gf-Gc framework”).  In order to complete this analysis, I needed standard CHC broad and narrow definitions—but none existed.


I developed the original broad and narrow definitions by abstracting definitions from Carroll’s (1993) book.  After drafting the first draft of the definitions I sent them to Carroll. He graciously took time to comment and edit the first draft. I subsequently revised the definitions and sent them back. Carrol and I engaged in a number of iterations until he was comfortable with the working definitions. As a result, the original definitions published in 1997 had the informal stamp of approval of Carroll, but not of Horn.  The official CHC definition birth certificate should list Carroll and McGrew as the parents.  Since then the CHC definitions have been primarily parented by McGrew (McGrew & Woodcock, 2001; McGrew, 2005; Schneider and McGrew, 2012; McGrew et al., 2014), and more recently, uncle Joel Schneider (Schneider & McGrew, 2012).  The other WJ III and WJ IV authors (Mather, Schrank, and Woodcock) have served as aunts and uncles at various points in the evolution of the definitions, resulting in the current “official” definitions in the WJ IV technical manual (McGrew et al., 2014).

No doubt the definitions that will appear in the Schneider and McGrew (2012) chapter that is currently under revision, will likely be considered the new “official” CHC definitions as they have a clear Carroll/McGrew and WJ III /WJ IV genetic lineage (McGrew, 1997—>McGrew & Woodcock, 2001—>McGrew, 2005—>Schneider & McGrew, 2012—>McGrew et al., 2014—>Schneider & McGrew, in press).  We (Schneider and McGrew) are reasonably comfortable with this fact.  However, we believe it is time the CHC definitions move out of the WJ/CHC house and establish a separate residence, identity, and process for future growth.  We will provides ideas on how this can be facilitated in our revised CHC chapter.

Research Byte: The Predictive Validity of Four Intelligence Tests for School Grades: A Small Sample Longitudinal Study in Germany

The Predictive Validity of Four Intelligence Tests for School Grades: A Small Sample Longitudinal Study

  • Department of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Intelligence is considered the strongest single predictor of scholastic achievement. However, little is known regarding the predictive validity of well-established intelligence tests for school grades. We analyzed the predictive validity of four widely used intelligence tests in German-speaking countries: The Intelligence and Development Scales (IDS), the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS), the Snijders-Oomen Nonverbal Intelligence Test (SON-R 6-40), and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), which were individually administered to 103 children (Mage = 9.17 years) enrolled in regular school. School grades were collected longitudinally after 3 years (averaged school grades, mathematics, and language) and were available for 54 children (Mage = 11.77 years). All four tests significantly predicted averaged school grades. Furthermore, the IDS and the RIAS predicted both mathematics and language, while the SON-R 6-40 predicted mathematics. The WISC-IV showed no significant association with longitudinal scholastic achievement when mathematics and language were analyzed separately. The results revealed the predictive validity of currently used intelligence tests for longitudinal scholastic achievement in German-speaking countries and support their use in psychological practice, in particular for predicting averaged school grades. However, this conclusion has to be considered as preliminary due to the small sample of children observed.

Parents empowered by Supreme Court ruling in special ed case



Parents empowered by Supreme Court ruling in special ed case

From News, a Flipboard magazine by Flipboard Newsdesk

Parents of learning disabled students say a unanimous Supreme Court ruling will make it easier for them to insist on appropriate services…

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Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Sharing Studying and Constructing Concept Maps: a Meta-Analysis via BrowZine

Studying and Constructing Concept Maps: a Meta-Analysis
Schroeder, Noah L.; Nesbit, John C.; Anguiano, Carlos J.; Adesope, Olusola O.
Educational Psychology Review: Articles in press



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IQs Corner-Intelligent IQ Insights

Reminder.  Daily content curation by Kevin "IQ" McGrew


IQs Corner-Intelligent IQ Insights

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Academics can change the world – if they stop talking only to their peers



Academics can change the world – if they stop talking only to their peers

Research and creative thinking can change the world. This means that academics have enormous power. But, as academics Asit…

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Picture: Hallmarks of adult development of fluid intelligence (Lövdén et al., 2010)


Hallmarks of adult development of fluid intelligence (Lövdén et al., 2010)
https://twitter.com/ROBERTO_COLOM/status/844505132419174400/photo/1

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Study: Rates of ADHD diagnosis and medication treatment continue to increase substantially



Study: Rates of ADHD diagnosis and medication treatment continue to increase substantially

— Beginning in about 1990, substantial increases in the rates of ADHD diagnosis and medical treatment were…

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Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Sharing Associations of intelligence across the life course with optimism and pessimism in older age via BrowZine

Associations of intelligence across the life course with optimism and pessimism in older age
Taylor, Adele M.; Ritchie, Stuart J.; Deary, Ian J.
Intelligence: Articles in press



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Sunday, March 19, 2017

Picture: Illustration of the neurological connections in the brain controlling speech production. (Credit: Stefan Fuertinger and Kristina Simonyan, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)



Illustration of the neurological connections in the brain controlling speech production. (Credit: Stefan Fuertinger and Kristina Simonyan, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)
https://www.instagram.com/p/BR0oWtojdwq/

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Dana Press Offers Cerebrum Anthology 2016



Dana Press Offers Cerebrum Anthology 2016

It somehow seemed appropriate that this year's Cerebrum anthology arrived at our offices just in time for the start of Brain Awareness Week (BAW), the global…

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******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
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Saturday, March 18, 2017

Sharing The structure of common emotion regulation strategies: A meta-analytic examination. via BrowZine

The structure of common emotion regulation strategies: A meta-analytic examination.
Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; McMahon, Tierney P.; Chacko, Thomas P.
Psychological Bulletin: Vol. 143 Issue 4 – 2017: 384 - 427

10.1037/bul0000093

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Saturday, March 11, 2017

Sharing Reducing the effect size of the retest effect: Examining different approaches via BrowZine

Reducing the effect size of the retest effect: Examining different approaches
Arendasy, Martin E.; Sommer, Markus
Intelligence: Articles in press



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Thursday, March 09, 2017

Sharing Estimating the dimensionality of intelligence like data using Exploratory Graph Analysis via BrowZine

I LOVE visually-oriented methods to understanding the dimensionality of intelligence test measures...e.g., cluster analysis and MDS. This looks like an intriguing article.

Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Sharing How Localized are Language Brain Areas? A Review of Brodmann Areas Involvement in Oral Language via BrowZine

How Localized are Language Brain Areas? A Review of Brodmann Areas Involvement in Oral Language
Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology: Vol. 31 Issue 1 – 2016: 112 - 122

10.1093/arclin/acv081

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Sharing Stability in Test-Usage Practices of Clinical Neuropsychologists in the United States and Canada Over a 10-Year Period: A Follow-Up Survey of INS and NAN Members via BrowZine

Stability in Test-Usage Practices of Clinical Neuropsychologists in the United States and Canada Over a 10-Year Period: A Follow-Up Survey of INS and NAN Members
Rabin, Laura A.; Paolillo, Emily; Barr, William B.
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology: Vol. 31 Issue 3 – 2016: 206 - 230

10.1093/arclin/acw007

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Novel Dimensional Aproach Uncovers Biomarker for Inattention



Novel Dimensional Aproach Uncovers Biomarker for Inattention

Summary: Greater variability in reaction time is associated with reduced gray matter volume in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, a new…

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Too Much Emotional Intelligence Is a Bad Thing



Too Much Emotional Intelligence Is a Bad Thing

Profound empathy may come at a price

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******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************