Wednesday, June 30, 2010

IQs Corner Recent Literature of Interest 06-30-10

This weeks "recent literature of interest" is now available. Click here.

Information regarding this feature, its basis, and the reasons for type of references included in each weekly installment can be found in a prior post.

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The Flynn Effect report series: Is the Flynn Effect a Scientifically Accepted Fact? IAP AP101 Report #7





Another new IAP Applied Psychometrics 101 report (#7) is now available.  The report is the second in the Flynn Effect series, a series of brief reports that will define, explain and discuss the validity of the Flynn Effect (click here to access all prior FE related posts at the ICDP blog) and the issues surrounding the application of a FE "adjustment" for scores based on tests with date norms (norm obsolescence), particularly in the context of Atkins MR/ID capital punishment cases.  The abstract for the brief report is presented below.  The report can be accessed by clicking here.

Report # 1 (What is the Flynn Effect) can be found by clicking here.

This report is the second in a series of brief reports the will define, explain, and summarize the scholarly consensus regarding the validity of the Flynn Effect (FE). This brief report presents a summary of the majority of FE research (in tabular form of n=113 publications) which indicates (via a simple “vote tally” method) that despite no consensus regarding the possible causes of the FE, it is overwhelming recognized as a fact by the scientific community. The series will conclude with an evaluation of the question whether a professional consensus has emerged regarding the practice of adjusting dated IQ test scores for the Flynn Effect, an issue of increasing debate in Atkins MR/ID capital punishment hearings.

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Tuesday, June 29, 2010

The Flynn Effect report series: What is the Flynn Effect: IAP AP101 Report #6

A new IAP Applied Psychometrics 101 report (#6) is now available.  The report is the first in the Flynn Effect series, a series of brief reports that will define, explain and discuss the validity of the Flynn Effect (click here to access all prior FE related posts at the ICDP blog) and the issues surrounding the application of a FE "adjustment" for scores based on tests with date norms (norm obsolescence), particularly in the context of Atkins MR/ID capital punishment cases.  The abstract for the brief report is presented below.  The report can be accessed by clicking here.
Norm obsolescence is recognized in the intelligence testing literature as a potential source of error in global IQ scores.  Psychological standards and assessment books recommend that assessment professionals use tests with the most current norms to minimize the possibility of norm obsolescence spuriously raising an individual’s measured IQ.  This phenomenon is typically referred to as the Flynn Effect.  This report is the first in a series of brief reports the will define, explain, and summarize the scholarly consensus regarding the validity of the Flynn Effect.  The series will conclude with an evaluation of the question whether a professional consensus has emerged regarding the practice of adjusting dated IQ test scores for the Flynn Effect, an issue of increasing debate in Atkins MR/ID capital punishment hearings.

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Monday, June 28, 2010

Research Bytes 6-28-10: Aging research--Gf and stress; decision-making mediated by Gs and Gsm?

Interesting articles of potential interest.  Anyone who would like to read the complete articles in exchange for writing a "brief" blog post about the article should contact the blogmaster @ iap@earthlink.net

Henninger, D. E., Madden, D. J., & Huettel, S. A. (2010). Processing Speed and Memory Mediate Age-Related
Differences in Decision Making. Psychology and Aging, 25(2), 262-270.
Decision making under risk changes with age. Increases in risk aversion with age have been most commonly characterized, although older adults may be risk seeking in some decision contexts. An important, and unanswered, question is whether these changes in decision making reflect a direct effect of aging or, alternatively, an indirect effect caused by age-related changes in specific cognitive processes. In the current study, older adults (M = 71 years) and younger adults (M = 24 years) completed a battery of tests of cognitive capacities and decision-making preferences. The results indicated systematic effects of age upon decision quality—with both increased risk seeking and increased risk aversion observed in different tasks—consistent with prior studies. Path analyses, however, revealed that age-related effects were mediated by individual differences in processing speed and memory. When those variables were included in the model, age was no longer a significant predictor of decision quality. The authors conclude that the reduction in decision quality and associated changes in risk preferences commonly ascribed to aging are instead mediated by age-related changes in underlying cognitive capacities


Stawski, R. S., Almeida, D. M., Lachman, M. E., Tun, P. A., & Rosnick, C. B. (2010). Fluid Cognitive Ability Is
Associated With Greater Exposure and Smaller Reactions to Daily Stressors. Psychology and Aging, 25(2),
330-342.
The authors of this study investigated whether fluid cognitive ability predicts exposure and emotional reactivity to daily stressors. A national sample of adults from the Midlife in the United States study and the National Study of Daily Experiences (N = 1,202) who had a mean age of 57 years (SD = 12; 56% women, 44% men) completed positive and negative mood reports as well as a stressor diary on 8 consecutive evenings via telephone. Participants also completed a telephone-based battery of tests measuring fluid cognitive ability. Higher levels of fluid cognitive ability were associated with greater exposure to work- and home-related overload stressors. Possessing higher levels of fluid cognitive ability was associated with smaller stressor-related increases in negative mood, primarily for interpersonal tensions and network stressors, and smaller stressor-related decreases in positive mood for interpersonal tensions. Furthermore, fluid cognitive ability was unrelated to subjective severity ratings of the stressors reported. Discussion focuses on the role of fluid cognitive ability in daily stress processes.

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iPost: Cognitive Neuroscience issue free online for two days

psypress: Cognitive Neuroscience- whole brand new issue free online
for next 2 days only! What are you waiting for? Get clicking! http://bit.ly/bZUVE8
Original Tweet: http://twitter.com/psypress/status/17242668265

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Brain fitness revolution report at link below


http://www.sharpbrains.com/blog/2010/06/28/new-report-finds-a-brain-health-revolution-in-the-making-driven-by-digital-technology-and-neuroplasticity-research/

Kevin McGrew PhD
Educational Psychologist
IAP (www.iapsych.com)
FInd via Google: IQs Corner

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Sunday, June 27, 2010

International Society for Intelligence Research (ISIR) Annual Conference: Dec 9-11, 2010

Registration and paper submission is now open for the International Society for Intelligence Research (ISIR) annual conference (Dec 9-11) near Washington, DC.  Check it out here.  This is the BEST human intelligence conference around.

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IQs Corner Recent Literature of Interest 06-25-10

This weeks "recent literature of interest" is now available. Click here.

Information regarding this feature, its basis, and the reasons for type of references included in each weekly installment can be found in a prior post.

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Thursday, June 24, 2010

Use of WJ III NU Cognitive and Achievement batteries in Canada: ASB #12 Report now available

ASB #12 Use of the Woodcock-Johnson III NU Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement with Canadian Populations  is now available for download at the Riverside Publishing web site (click here).

As described at the Riverside web page:
This bulletin examines the use of the Woodcock-Johnson III Normative Update (WJ III NU) Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement  with a random sample of 310 school-age Canadian students. Results were compared with a matched sample of U.S. subjects selected from the WJ III NU standardization sample using WJ III NU norms. While some minor score differences are reported across the two samples, the study findings generally support the use of the U.S.-based WJ III NU norms with Canadian school-age populations.

Conflict of interest - I am a coauthor of the WJ III battery.  Complete conflict of interest disclosure information is available via a link on the blog roll side bar of this blog.

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Monday, June 21, 2010

Speech rhythm perception (Ga?) important for early reading

Holliman, A. J., Wood, C., & Sheehy, K. (2010). Does Speech Rhythm Sensitivity Predict Children's Reading Ability 1 Year Later? Journal of Educational Psychology, 102(2), 356-366.

There is a growing literature demonstrating that speech rhythm sensitivity is related to children's reading development, independent of phonological awareness. However, the precise nature of this relationship is less well understood, and further research is warranted to investigate whether speech rhythm sensitivity predicts the different components of reading over time. In this 1-year longitudinal study, 69 five- to 8-year-old English-speaking children completed a speech rhythm assessment at Time 1 along with other cognitive assessments and then completed a variety of reading assessments at Time 2 (1 year later). A series of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that after controlling for individual differences in age, vocabulary, and phonological awareness, speech rhythm sensitivity was able to predict unique variance in word reading and the phrasing component of the reading fluency measure 1 year later. The findings emphasize the contribution of speech rhythm sensitivity in children's reading development, and the authors argue that speech rhythm sensitivity should now be included in current models of children's reading development.

Speech rhythm was measured via the revised mispronounciations task:  As described in the article:

Speech rhythm sensitivity was measured using the revised mispronunciations task (Holliman et al., in press). Children heard a prerecorded word that was sounded through a speaker, where the stress of that word had been manipulated and reversed. For example, in the normal pronunciation of the word carrot [kær?t], the vowel in the first syllable is fully articulated and the vowel in the second syllable is reduced. However, in this task the stress was reversed so that the vowel in the first syllable became reduced and the vowel in the second syllable was fully articulated; carrot was pronounced as “c’rot” [k?'r?t]. To succeed in this task, children would need to be sensitive to the fact that the stress had been manipulated, and be
able to recover the correct stress, making a stress shift (Kitzen, 2001) to match the auditory input to a word stored in the lexicon, and then identify the corresponding target item from a choice of four pictures available.
If anyone would like a copy of the PDF article, in exchange for a brief guest blog post review of the article, contact the blogmaster @ iap@earthlink.net


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Research bytes 6-20-2010: Cognitive correlates of bilingualism; morphological instruction and literacy

Adesope, O. O., Lavin, T., Thompson, T., & Ungerleider, C. (2010). A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Cognitive Correlates of BilingualismReview of Educational Research, 80(20), 207-245.


A number of studies have documented the cognitive outcomes associated  with bilingualism. To gain a clear understanding of the extent  and diversity of these cognitive outcomes, the authors conducted  a meta-analysis of studies that examined the cognitive correlates  of bilingualism. Data from 63 studies (involving 6,022 participants) were extracted and analyzed following established protocols and procedures for conducting systematic reviews and guidelines for meta-analysis. Results indicate that bilingualism is reliably associated with several cognitive outcomes, including increased attentional control, working memory, metalinguistic awareness, and abstract and symbolic representation skills. Overall mean effect sizes varied from small to large, depending on the cognitive outcomes measured, and were moderated by methodological features of the studies.

Bowers, P. N., Kirby, J. R., & Deacon, S. H. (2010). The Effects of Morphological Instruction on Literacy Skills: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Review of Educational Research, 80(2), 144-179.


The authors reviewed all peer-reviewed studies with participants from preschool to Grade 8 for this meta-analysis of morphological interventions. They identified 22 applicable studies. Instructional effects (Cohen’s d) were averaged by linguistic outcome categories (morphological sublexical, nonmorphological sublexical, lexical, and supralexical) and comparison group (experimental group vs. control or experimental group vs. alternative training). The authors investigated the effects of morphological instruction (a) on reading, spelling, vocabulary, and morphological skills, (b) for less able readers versus undifferentiated samples, (c) for younger versus older students, and (d) in combination with instruction of other literacy skills or in isolation. Results indicate that (a) morphological instruction benefits learners, (b) it brings particular benefits for less able readers, (c) it is no less effective for younger students, and (d) it is more effective when combined with other aspects of literacy instruction. Implications of these findings are discussed in light of current educational practice and theory.

Anyone interested in securing access to any of these articles, in exchange for a brief blog guest post, contact the blogmaster @ iap@earthlink.net



Friday, June 18, 2010

Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology: Woodock-Johnson III chapter

NOTE -- after making this post I've learned that I may not have had appropriate position to post a link to the PDF copy of the WJ III chapter.  Thus, those URL's have been temporarily deactivated.  I will reactivate if I get clearance.  Sorry.

The forthcoming Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology (Dr. Andrew Davis) can now be pre-ordered from Springer Publishing.

A description of the book, at the publisher website, is below:
This handbook covers basic neurodevelopmental research that any pediatric neuropsychologist will need to know. The authors discuss practical issues in pediatric assessment, and provide a comprehensive overview of the most common medical conditions that neuropsycholoigists encounter while dealing with pediatric populations.

The book also describes a variety of professional issues that neuropsychologists must confront during their daily practice, such as ethics, multiculturalism, child abuse, forensics, and psychopharmacology. Also discussed are school-based issues such as special education law, consulting with school staff, and reintegrating children back into mainstream schools.

An incomplete table of contents is available at the website.  The complete TOC is listed below...it includes 95 chapters...yes, that is correct!!!!!  Simply a major tome.

I received an advanced copy of the chapter dealing with the WJ III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (Dr. Fred Schrank).  This chapter is unique in that it is the first comprehensive presentation of research results regarding WJ III cluster and test scores on over 2,200 subjects with a variety of clinical diagnoses (ADHD, anxiety spectrum disorders, head injury, autism spectrum disorders, types of learning disabilities, MR/ID, etc.) who are part of the Woodcock-Munoz Foundation Clinical Data Base.


    Section 1: Development
1    Intrauterine Development of the Central Nervous System
2    Neuropsychological Development of Newborns, Infants and Toddlers (0 to 3)
3    Neuropsychology of Early Child Development (Ages 3 to 5)
4    Neuropsychology of Middle Child Development (Ages 6 to 11)
5    Neuropsychology of Adolescent Development (Ages 12 to 18)
6    Cognitive Development
7    Speech and Language Development
8    Moral Development
    Section 2: Functional Neuroanatomy for Pediatric Neuropsychologists

9    Cells, Synapses, and Circuits
10    Cerebral Vascular Anatomy and its Clinico-Anatomic Correlates
11    The Spinal Cord
12    Functional Neuroanatomy of Structures of the Hindbrain, Midbrain, Diencephalon and Basal Ganglia.
13    Functional Neuroanatomy of the Limbic System
14    Functional Neuroanatomy of the Cerebellum
15    Functional Neuroanatomy of the Cerebral Cortex
16    Plasticity in a Pediatric Population
    Section 3: Pediatric Neuropsychological Assessment
17    Assessment of Premorbid Functioning in a Pediatric Population
18    Neuropsychological Assessment of Newborns, Infants and Toddlers
19    Assessment of Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders
20    Assessing Diverse Populations with Nonverbal Measures of Ability in a Neuropsychological Context
21    Achievement Tests in Pediatric Neuropsychology
22    Assessing Adaptive Skills in a Pediatric Population
23    Measurement of Attention: Theoretical and Operational Considerations
24    Assessment of Executive Functions in a Pediatric Population
25    Memory Testing in Pediatric Neuropsychology
26    Personality Assessment for a Pediatric Population
27    Assessing Visual-Spatial and Construction Skills in a Pediatric Population
28    Cognitive Assessment System: Redefining Intelligence from a Neuropsychological Perspective
29    The Dean-Woodcock Sensory-Motor Battery
30    Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition
31    Examining and Using the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery: Is it our Future or our Past
32    The Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Test Battery
33    NEPSY-II
34    Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test-Fifth Edition
35    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition in Neuropsychological Practice
36    Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities
    Section 4: The Assessment Process for Pediatric Neuropsychologists
37    The Pediatric Diagnostic Interview and Neurobehavioral Evaluation
38    Pediatric Neuropsychological Testing: Theoretical Models of Test Selection and Interpretation
39    Malingering and Related Conditions in Pediatric Populations
40    Delayed and Progressive IQ Decline in Pediatric Patients
41    Writing Pediatric Neuropsychology Reports
42    Conducting Feedback for Pediatric Neuropsychological Assessments
    Section 5: Pediatric Neuropsychological Disorders
43    Pervasive Developmental Disorders
44    Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
45    Reactive Attachment Disorder
46    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
47    Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder
48    Developmental Dyspraxia and Developmental Coordination Disorder
49    Pediatric Tic Disorders
50    Eating Disorders
51    Neuropsychology of Pediatric Anxiety Disorders
52    Mood Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence
53    Dyslexia
54    An Overview of Neuroscience Contributions to the Understanding of Dyscalculia in Children
55    Neuropsychology of Written Language Disorders
56    Receptive and Expressive Language Disorders of Childhood
57    Neuropsychology of Auditory Processing Disorders
58    Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: Assessment and Intervention
59    Perinatal Complications
60    Long-Term Outcome Following Preterm Birth
61    Periventricular Leukomalacia (PVL): Pathogenesis and Long-Term Outcomes
62    Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus
63    Down Syndrome
64    The Dystrophinopathies
65    Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies
66    Neurofibromatosis, Type 1: from Gene to Classroom
67    Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders
68    Pediatric HIV/AIDS
69    Infectious Diseases of the Central Nervous System: Neurobehavioral and Neuropsychological Sequelae
70    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
71    Central Nervous System Cancers
72    Pediatric Neuropsychology and Sleep Disorders
73    Neuropsychology and Headache
74    Seizure Disorders
75    Pediatric Neuropsychology of Substance Abuse
76    Toxic Exposures
77    Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents
    Section 6: Professional Issues for Pediatric Neuropsychologists
78    The Past, Present, and Future of Pediatric Neuropsychology
79    Cultural Considerations in Pediatric Neuropsychology
80    Ethical and Legal Guidelines for Pediatric Neuropsychologists
81    Functional Behavioral Assessment
82    Professional Issues for Pediatric Neuropsychologists: Behavioral Interventions
83    Neuropsychological Aspects of Child Abuse and Neglect
84    Forensic Pediatric Neuropsychology
85    Neuroimaging and Pediatric Neuropsychology: Implications for Clinical Practice
86    Psychopharmacology for Pediatric Neuropsychologists
87    Neuropsychology of Gifted Children
88    Sport Neuropsychology for Children
    Section 7: Neuropsychology in the Schools
89    Consulting with School Staff
90    Special Education Law and 504 Plans
91    Participating in Case Conferences
92    Curriculum-Based Measurement
93    Response to Intervention (RTI) from a Neuropsychological Perspective
94    Facilitating School Reintegration for Children with Traumatic Brain Injury
95    Developing and Implementing Evidence-Based Academic Interventions

[Conflict of interest Notice- I am a co-author of the WJ III Battery and am also Research Director for WMF]

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IQs Corner Recent Literature of Interest 6-17-10 and 6-18-10

This weeks "recent literature of interest" is now available.  Click here and here for the last two weeks findings

Information regarding this feature, its basis, and the reasons for type of references included in each weekly installment can be found in a prior post.

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iPost: Subscores based on MIRT methods

JournalPsychometrika
PublisherSpringer New York
ISSN0033-3123 (Print) 1860-0980 (Online)
IssueVolume 75, Number 2 / June, 2010
DOI10.1007/s11336-010-9158-4


Shelby J. Haberman1 and Sandip SinharayContact Information

(1) ETS, Princeton, NJ, USA

Received: 13 January 2009  Revised:5 November 2009  Published online: 27 March 2010

Abstract  
Recently, there has been increasing interest in reporting subscores. This paper examines reporting of subscores using multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) models (e.g., Reckase in Appl. Psychol. Meas. 21:25–36, 1997; C.R. Rao and S. Sinharay (Eds), Handbook of Statistics, vol. 26, pp. 607–642, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 2007; Beguin & Glas in Psychometrika, 66:471–488, 2001). A MIRT model is fitted using a stabilized Newton–Raphson algorithm (Haberman in The Analysis of Frequency Data, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1974; Sociol. Methodol. 18:193–211, 1988) with adaptive Gauss–Hermite quadrature (Haberman, von Davier, & Lee in ETS Research Rep. No. RR-08-45, ETS, Princeton, 2008). A new statistical approach is proposed to assess when subscores using the MIRT model have any added value over (i)  the total score or (ii)  subscores based on classical test theory (Haberman in J. Educ. Behav. Stat. 33:204–229, 2008; Haberman, Sinharay, & Puhan in Br. J. Math. Stat. Psychol. 62:79–95, 2008). The MIRT-based methods are applied to several operational data sets. The results show that the subscores based on MIRT are slightly more accurate than subscore estimates derived by classical test theory.



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Thursday, June 17, 2010

Even airline coffee tastes good at 6:30 AM

iPost: Intuition and "Blink" in proper perspective

Good story that addresses concerns I've had about Gladwells best
selling book BLINK. Some will recall that another author appropriately
countered BLINK with a book called THINK. I posted about these long
ago at IQs Corner. Can't add links to these posts now as I am standing
in line to board a plane and am doing mobile blogging.

Good read below.

Don't always trust your gut


http://chronicle.com/article/The-Trouble-With-Intuition/65674/

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Tuesday, June 08, 2010

iPost: Cognitive speed, working memory and TBI

JournalBrain Imaging and Behavior
PublisherSpringer New York
ISSN1931-7557 (Print) 1931-7565 (Online)
IssueVolume 4, Number 2 / June, 2010
DOI10.1007/s11682-010-9094-z
Pages141-154
Subject CollectionBehavioral Science
SpringerLink DateSaturday, May 01, 2010

Frank G. Hillary1, 2, 6 Contact Information, Helen M. Genova3, John D. Medaglia1, Neal M. Fitzpatrick4, Kathy S. Chiou1, Britney M. Wardecker1, Robert G. Franklin Jr.1, Jianli Wang4 and John DeLuca3, 5


The cognitive constructs working memory (WM) and processing speed are fundamental components to general intellectual functioning in humans and highly susceptible to disruption following neurological insult. Much of the work to date examining speeded working memory deficits in clinical samples using functional imaging has demonstrated recruitment of network areas including prefrontal cortex (PFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). What remains unclear is the nature of this neural recruitment. The goal of this study was to isolate the neural networks distinct from those evident in healthy adults and to determine if reaction time (RT) reliably predicts observable between-group differences. The current data indicate that much of the neural recruitment in TBI during a speeded visual scanning task is positively correlated with RT. These data indicate that recruitment in PFC during tasks of rapid information processing are at least partially attributable to normal recruitment of PFC support resources during slowed task processing.
Electronic supplementary material  The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11682-010-9094-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Keywords  TBI - fMRI - Reorganization - Working memory - Processing speed



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Monday, June 07, 2010

On the road again--blogging lite June 8-17


I will be on the road again for the next 1.5 weeks.  I will be attending and presenting at a professional conference June 8-12.  From June 15-17 I will be back on the road for work purposes.

I don't expect much time to blog...except for possible "push" type FYI posts re: content posted at other blogs.....or...mobile blogging (iPosts:  check out the link.....it is very cool...but, of course, I tend to be a tech nerd)......

I shall return.

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Saturday, June 05, 2010

IQs Corner Recent Literature of Interest 06-05-2010

This weeks "recent literature of interest" is now available.  Click here for download.

Information regarding this feature, its basis, and the reasons for type of references included in each weekly installment can be found in a prior post.

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Friday, June 04, 2010

iPost: Journal of Individual Differences - Volume 31, Issue 2

Isssue devoted to Gv spatial ability research

A new issue is available for the following Hogrefe & Huber journal:

Journal of Individual Differences

Volume 31, Issue 2

New approaches to studying individual differences in spatial abilities.
Page 57-58
Glück, Judith; Quaiser-Pohl, Claudia; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.
Map understanding as a developmental marker in childhood.
Page 64-67
Peter, Michael; Glück, Judith; Beiglböck, Wolfgang
Use of strategy in a 3-dimensional spatial ability test.
Page 74-77
Strasser, Irene; Koller, Ingrid; Strauß, Sabine; Csisinko, Mathis; Kaufmann, Hannes; Glück, Judith
Effects of age and sex in mental rotation and spatial learning from virtual environments.
Page 78-82
Schoenfeld, Robby; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Leplow, Bernd
Ecological aspects of mental rotation around the vertical and horizontal axis.
Page 110-113
Battista, Christian; Peters, Michael

To edit your profile or discontinue receiving table of contents alerts, visit http://psycalert.apa.org or your MyPsycNET page on APA PsycNET.

iPost: AACN 2010: Neuropsychology Journals & Articles



Psychology Press

 

American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology
8th Annual Conference, June 17-19, Chicago

Visit the Psychology Press Booth at this year's AACN Conference to take advantage of our 20% conference discount, free shipping on all our books, and free samples of these journals:

 

The Clinical Neuropsychologist

Official Journal of the AACN

Impact Factor 1.75*

 

Child Neuropsychology

Impact Factor 1.935*

 

Recent Special Issues:

 

Future Directions in Pediatric TBI

A Special Issue of Applied Neuropsychology

Guest Editors: Eric E. Pierson and Chad A. Noggle

Showcases articles on the importance of evaluating factors related to assessment and treatment not only from an injury severity and developmental perspective but also the importance of familial and social functioning.

Read in full the introduction to this special issue: Pediatric TBI: Prevalence and Functional Ramifications by Eric E. Pierson and Chad A. Noggle (Vol. 17:2 81-82).

 

39th Clinical Aphasiology Conference

A Special Issue of Aphasiology

Guest Editor: Beth Armstrong

This year's special issue contains papers presented at the 39th Clinical Aphasiology Conference held in Keystone, Colorado in May, 2009. The issue contains another excellent mix of articles, demonstrating the depth and breadth of issues covered in clinical aphasiology at the present time.

Pre-order this special issue with a 10% discount from our website.

 

More journals at AACN:

 

Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

Impact Factor 1.667*

 

Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

25% more issues in 2010 - Impact Factor 2.184*

 

Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition

Impact Factor 1.143*

 

Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention

Wednesday, June 02, 2010

Updated K. McGrew blogmaster CV, Bio, and Conflict of Interest Disclosure statements

I have made access to my CV, Bio, and Conflict of Interest Disclosure easier to find at all three of my professional blogs.  This information is at the top of the blog roll side bar at each blog.  The URL's should take all to this information which is formally listed and linked at my ICDP blog.  This information will also be updated the next time the IAP web page is revised.

Any questions should be directed to me at:  iap@earthlink.net

Kevin McGrew

Cognitive differences between students with divergent listening and reading comprehsnion skills

FYI.  The following report is now available at the Partnership for Accessible Reading Assessment (PARA) web page.  Click here to visit page where report can be downloaded as PDF.
  • McGrew, K. S., Moen, R. E., & Thurlow, M. L. (2010). Cognitive and achievement differences between students with divergent reading and oral comprehension skills: Implications for accessible reading assessment research. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Partnership for Accessible Reading Assessment.
Conflict of interest notice:  This study includes analysis of measures from the WJ III Battery.  I, Kevin McGrew, and a coauthor of the WJ III and thus have a financial royalty interest in the battery used in this study.

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iPost: More blow back on test author suing to stop critical scholarly article on his instrument

http://forensicpsychologist.blogspot.com/2010/06/more-coverage-of-psychopathy-censorship.html

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