Tuesday, January 24, 2023

Sharing "What Is the Source of the Correlation Between Reading and Mathematics Achievement? Two Meta-analytic Studies" via BrowZine

What Is the Source of the Correlation Between Reading and Mathematics Achievement? Two Meta-analytic Studies
Ünal, Zehra E.; Greene, Nathaniel R.; Lin, Xin; Geary, David C.
Educational Psychology Review: Vol. 35 Issue 1, p. 4, 2023.

Abstract Two meta-analyses assessed whether the relations between reading and mathematics outcomes could be explained through overlapping skills (e.g., systems for word and fact retrieval) or domain-general influences (e.g., top-down attentional control). The first (378 studies, 1,282,796 participants) included weighted random-effects meta-regression models to explore and contrast the magnitudes of the links between dif-ferent reading and mathematical competencies. The second (138 studies, 39,836 par-ticipants) used meta-analytic structural equation modeling to determine the influence of a domain-general factor, defined by intelligence, executive functioning, working and short-term memory, and processing speed measures, on the link between read-ing and mathematics skills. The overall relation was significant (r=0.52), as were all associations between specific reading and mathematics measures (rs = 0.23 to 0.61, ps<.05). Most of the correlations were similar across different types of reading and mathematics competencies, although generally smaller than within-domain correla-tions. The domain-general model explained most of the covariance between reading and mathematics outcomes, with a few modest moderating effects (e.g., age). The results imply correlations between reading and mathematics measures are largely due to domain-general processes, although within-domain correlations confirm the importance of overlapping competencies especially for reading.

Keywords  Reading · Mathematics · Domain-general ability · Meta-analyses


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Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
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Wednesday, January 18, 2023

What lies beneath the structure of intelligence? Overview of the special issue on the processes underlying intelligence - ScienceDirect

What lies beneath the structure of intelligence? Overview of the special issue on the processes underlying intelligence - ScienceDirect
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0160289623000016?via%3Dihub

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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Saturday, January 07, 2023

Effectiveness of digital game-based trainings in children with neurodevelopmental disorders: A meta-analysis - ScienceDirect

 Effectiveness of digital game-based trainings in children with neurodevelopmental disorders: A meta-analysis - ScienceDirect 
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0891422222002487?via%3Dihub

Abstract
Digital game-based training programs have recently been used to train the cognitive abilities of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). However, the effects of training remain controversial. The present meta-analysis explored the effectiveness of digital game-based training in children with NDDs and examined the possible moderators of its effects. Twenty-nine studies with cognitive outcomes in 1535 children were included in the present meta-analysis. The results showed that digital game-based training could significantly enhance the core cognitive abilities of children with each type of NDDs and that training could be used remotely. Meanwhile, task content and game features of digital game-based interventions separately make unique and significant contributions to the training effects, suggesting that the combination of training content and game features could efficiently improve children's cognition. Although the present study revealed that the training benefits could be maintained over a period of time, more studies are needed to explore the retention effects of digital game-based training. The present study provides a comprehensive understanding of the training effects of digital game-based interventions and new insights for future cognitive training design and application.

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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Wednesday, December 21, 2022

A Big Five-Based Multimethod Social and Emotional Skills Assessment: The Mosaic by ACT& Social Emotional Learning Assessment

 J. Intell. | Free Full-Text | A Big Five-Based Multimethod Social and Emotional Skills Assessment: The Mosaic&trade; by ACT&reg; Social Emotional Learning Assessment 
https://www.mdpi.com/2079-3200/10/4/72
Abstract
A focus on implementing social and emotional (SE) learning into curricula continues to gain popularity in K-12 educational contexts at the policy and practitioner levels. As it continues to be elevated in educational discourse, it becomes increasingly clear that it is important to have reliable, validated measures of students' SE skills. Here we argue that framework and design are additional important considerations for the development and selection of SE skill assessments. We report the reliability and validity evidence for The Mosaic™ by ACT® Social Emotional Learning Assessment, an assessment designed to measure SE skills in middle and high school students that makes use of a research-based framework (the Big Five) and a multi-method approach (three item types including Likert, forced choice, and situational judgment tests). Here, we provide the results from data collected from more than 33,000 students who completed the assessment and for whom we have data on various outcome measures. We examined the validity evidence for the individual item types and the aggregate scores based on those three. Our findings support the contribution of multi-method assessment and an aggregate score. We discuss the ways the field can benefit from this or similarly designed assessments and discuss how the assessment results can be used by practitioners to promote programs aimed at stimulating students' personal growth.


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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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Friday, December 16, 2022

Metacognition and self-control: An integrative framework. - PsycNET

 Metacognition and self-control: An integrative framework. - PsycNET 
https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2023-29488-001

Hennecke, M., & B├╝rgler, S. (2022). Metacognition and self-control: An integrative framework. Psychological Review. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/rev0000406

Abstract
Self-control describes the processes by which individuals control their habits, desires, and impulses in the service of long-term goals. Research has identified important components of self-control and proposed theoretical frameworks integrating these components (e.g., Inzlicht et al., 2021; Kotabe & Hofmann, 2015). In our perspective, these frameworks, however, do not yet fully incorporate important metacognitive aspects of self-control. We therefore introduce a framework explicating the role of metacognition for self-control. This framework extends existing frameworks, primarily from the domains of self-regulated learning and problem-solving (e.g., Schraw & Moshman, 1995; Zimmerman, 2000), and integrates past and contemporary research and theorizing on self-control that involves aspects of metacognition. It considers two groups of metacognitive components, namely, (a) individual metacognitive characteristics, that is a person's declarative, procedural, and conditional metacognitive knowledge about self-control, as well as their self-awareness (or metacognitive awareness), and (b) metacognitive regulatory processes that unfold before a self-control conflict (forethought and prevention), when a self-control conflict is identified, during a self-control conflict (regulation and monitoring), and after a self-control conflict (reflection and evaluation). The proposed framework integrates existing research and will be useful for highlighting new directions for research on the role of metacognition for self-control success and failure. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)




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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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Thursday, December 08, 2022

Full article: Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue “Advances in the Measurement and Evaluation of Creativity”

Full article: Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue "Advances in the Measurement and Evaluation of Creativity"
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10400419.2022.2152555

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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Monday, December 05, 2022

From MDPI: "Multidimensional Scaling of Cognitive Ability and Academic Achievement Scores" - Open Access….you can download and read for free!

I LOVE MDS and modern visual-graphic methods (e.g., psychometric network analysis) for analyzing multidimensional cognitive and achievement data

https://www.mdpi.com/1981340:

Multidimensional Scaling of Cognitive Ability and Academic Achievement ScoresMultidimensional scaling (MDS) was used as an alternate multivariate procedure for investigating intelligence and academic achievement test score correlations. Correlation coefficients among Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fifth Edition (WISC-5) and Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, Third Edition (WIAT-III) validity sample scores and among Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II) and Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, Second Edition (KTEA-2) co-norming sample scores were analyzed using multidimensional scaling (MDS). Three-dimensional MDS configurations were the best fit for interpretation in both datasets. Subtests were more clearly organized by CHC ability and academic domain instead of complexity. Auditory-linguistic, figural-visual, reading-writing, and quantitative-numeric regions were visible in all models. Results were mostly similar across different grade levels. Additional analysis with WISC-V and WIAT-III tests showed that content (verbal, numeric, figural) and response process facets (verbal, manual, paper-pencil) were also useful in explaining test locations. Two implications from this study are that caution may be needed when interpreting fluency scores across academic areas, and MDS provides more empirically[...]


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Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
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Thursday, December 01, 2022

Ongoing trends of human intelligence - ScienceDirect

 Ongoing trends of human intelligence - ScienceDirect 
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0160289622000897?via%3Dihub

Abstract
The aim of the study is to estimate the most recent trends of intelligence world-wide. We find that the most recent studies report mainly positive Flynn effects in economically less developed countries, but trivial and frequently negative Flynn effects in the economically most advanced countries. This is confirmed by an analysis of 48 countries in the 2000–2018 PISA tests, showing that high pre-existing IQ and school achievement are the best predictors of declining test scores. IQ gaps between countries are still large (e.g., 19 IQ points in PISA between East Asia and South Asia) but are diminishing world-wide. We predict that these trends, observed in adolescents today, will reduce cognitive gaps between the working-age populations of countries and world regions during coming decades. As is predicted by the well-established relationship between intelligence and economic growth, there is already evidence that the ongoing cognitive convergence is paralleled by global economic convergence. These developments raise questions as to how long this cognitive and economic convergence will continue, whether it will eliminate cognitive and economic gaps between countries entirely, and whether a condition with high levels of cognitive ability and economic prosperity is sustainable long-term.

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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Tuesday, November 15, 2022

Domain-specificity of Flynn effects in the CHC-model: Stratum II test score changes in Germanophone samples (1996–2018) - ScienceDirect

 Domain-specificity of Flynn effects in the CHC-model: Stratum II test score changes in Germanophone samples (1996–2018) - ScienceDirect 
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289622000885

Generational IQ test score changes (the Flynn effect) were globally positive over large parts of the 20th century. However, accumulating evidence of recent studies shows a rather inconsistent pattern in past decades. Patterns of recently observed test score changes appeared to be markedly different in strength and even signs between countries and domains. Because of between-study design differences and data availability in terms of differing IQ domains, it is so far unclear if these inconsistencies represent a consequence of differences in Flynn effect trajectories between countries, covered time-spans, or investigated IQ domains. Here, we present data from 36 largely population-representative Germanophone standardization samples from 12 well-established psychometric tests (17 subtests) of 10 stratum II domains from 1996 to 2018, thus providing a comprehensive assessment of domain-specific changes according to the Cattell-Horn-Carroll intelligence model. Examination of both raw score and measurement-invariant latent mean changes yielded positive (comprehension-knowledge, learning-efficiency, domain-specific knowledge), negative (working memory capacity), stagnating (processing speed, reading and writing), and ambiguous (fluid reasoning, reaction and decision speed, quantitative knowledge, visual processing) stratum II Flynn effects. This means that in the present sample, the Flynn effect is surprisingly differentiated on domain level and does not conform to the frequently observed IQ test score gains in crystallized and fluid intelligence. These findings could be attributed to either (i) a so far undetected domain-specificity of the Flynn effect due to an unavailability of test data beyond crystallized and fluid domains or (ii) a symptom for an impending stagnation of the Flynn effect.

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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Sunday, November 13, 2022

Frontiers | The relation between rhythm processing and cognitive abilities during child development: The role of prediction

 Frontiers | The relation between rhythm processing and cognitive abilities during child development: The role of prediction 
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.920513/full

Rhythm and meter are central elements of music. From the very beginning, children are responsive to rhythms and acquire increasingly complex rhythmic skills over the course of development. Previous research has shown that the processing of musical rhythm is not only related to children's music-specific responses but also to their cognitive abilities outside the domain of music. However, despite a lot of research on that topic, the connections and underlying mechanisms involved in such relation are still unclear in some respects. In this article, we aim at analyzing the relation between rhythmic and cognitive-motor abilities during childhood and at providing a new hypothesis about this relation. We consider whether predictive processing may be involved in the relation between rhythmic and various cognitive abilities and hypothesize that prediction as a cross-domain process is a central mechanism building a bridge between rhythm processing and cognitive-motor abilities. Further empirical studies focusing on rhythm processing and cognitive-motor abilities are needed to precisely investigate the links between rhythmic, predictive, and cognitive processes

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Kevin S. McGrew, PhD
Educational & School Psychologist
Director
Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)
https://www.themindhub.com
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