Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Two more Go (general olfactory ability domain) research articles to file under Go in CHC taxonomy of human abilities

Longitudinal changes in odor identification performance and neuropsychological measures in aging individuals.
Neuropsychology, Vol 30(1), Jan 2016, 87-97. http://dx.doi.org.ezp1.lib.umn.edu/10.1037/neu0000212

Abstract

  1. Objective: To examine changes in odor identification performance and cognitive measures in healthy aging individuals. While cross-sectional studies reveal associations between odor identification and measures of episodic memory, processing speed, and executive function, longitudinal studies so far have been ambiguous with regard to demonstrating that odor identification may be predictive of decline in cognitive function. Method: One hundred and 7 healthy aging individuals (average age 60.2 years, 71% women) were assessed with an odor identification test and nonolfactory cognitive measures of verbal episodic memory, mental processing speed, executive function, and language 3 times, covering a period of 6.5 years. Results: The cross-sectional results revealed odor identification performance to be associated with age, measures of verbal episodic memory, and processing speed. Using linear mixed models, the longitudinal analyses revealed age-associated decline in all measures. Controlling for retest effects, the analyses demonstrated that gender was a significant predictor for episodic memory and mental processing speed. Odor identification performance was further shown to be a significant predictor for episodic verbal memory. Conclusion: This study shows age-related decline in odor identification as well as nonolfactory cognitive measures. The finding showing that odor identification is a significant predictor for verbal episodic memory is of great clinical interest as odor identification has been suggested as a sensitive measure of incipient pathologic cognitive decline. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)

Olfactory identification and its relationship to executive functions, memory, and disability one year after severe traumatic brain injury.
Neuropsychology, Vol 30(1), Jan 2016, 98-108. http://dx.doi.org.ezp1.lib.umn.edu/10.1037/neu0000206

Abstract

  1. Objective: To explore the frequency of posttraumatic olfactory (dys)function 1 year after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and determine whether there is a relationship between olfactory identification and neuropsychological test performance, injury severity and TBI-related disability. Method: A population-based multicenter study including 129 individuals with severe TBI (99 males; 16 to 85 years of age) that could accomplish neuropsychological examinations. Olfactory (dys)function (anosmia, hyposmia, normosmia) was assessed by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) or the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT). Three tests of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS) were used to assess processing speed, verbal fluency, inhibition and set-shifting, and the California Verbal Learning Test-II was used to examine verbal memory. The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) was used to measure disability level. Results: Employing 2 different smell tests in 2 equal-sized subsamples, the UPSIT sample (n = 65) classified 34% with anosmia and 52% with hyposmia, while the B-SIT sample (n = 64) classified 20% with anosmia and 9% with hyposmia. Individuals classified with anosmia by the B-SIT showed significantly lower scores for set-shifting, category switching fluency and delayed verbal memory compared to hyposmia and normosmia groups. Only the B-SIT scores were significantly correlated with neuropsychological performance and GOSE scores. Brain injury severity (Rotterdam CT score) and subarachnoid hemorrhage were related to anosmia. Individuals classified with anosmia demonstrated similar disability as those with hyposmia/normosmia. Conclusions: Different measures of olfaction may yield different estimates of anosmia. Nevertheless, around 1 third of individuals with severe TBI suffered from anosmia, which may also indicate poorer cognitive outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)

Friday, December 25, 2015

New Wechsler Flynn Effect study by Weiss et al. (2015)

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Sharing Sex and sex-role differences in specific cognitive abilities via BrowZine

Sex and sex-role differences in specific cognitive abilities
Reilly, David; Neumann, David L.; Andrews, Glenda
Intelligence, Vol. 54 – 2016: 147 - 158

10.1016/j.intell.2015.12.004

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Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Feelings and the Sense of Time in the Brain



Feelings and the Sense of Time in the Brain

Time moves slowly when sitting on a very hot surface and when waiting for a lover to arrive. It moves quickly when joyful. If life is threatened time moves…

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Sharing Increases in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and decreases the rostral prefrontal cortex activation after-8 weeks of focused attention based mindfulness meditation via BrowZine

Increases in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and decreases the rostral prefrontal cortex activation after-8 weeks of focused attention based mindfulness meditation
Tomasino, Barbara; Fabbro, Franco
Brain and Cognition, Vol. 102 – 2016: 46 - 54

10.1016/j.bandc.2015.12.004

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Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Sharing Cognitive correlates of developing intelligence: The contribution of working memory, processing speed and attention via BrowZine

Cognitive correlates of developing intelligence: The contribution of working memory, processing speed and attention
Tourva, Anna; Spanoudis, George; Demetriou, Andreas
Intelligence, Vol. 54 – 2016: 136 - 146

10.1016/j.intell.2015.12.001

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More research support for the P-FIT neuro-model of intelligence (Gf and Gwm)

Another study, with an excellent integration of other research, supporting the parietal-frontal integration (P-FIT) neuro-model of intelligence, specifically the networks involvement in fluid reasoning (Gf) and working memory capacity (Gwm), but not Gs.  Click here for prior P-FIT related posts.  The amount of research providing some support for the P-FIT model can not be ignored.

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Sharing A Dual Process Account of Creative Thinking via BrowZine

A Dual Process Account of Creative Thinking
Allen, Andrew P.; Thomas, Kevin E.
Creativity Research Journal, Vol. 23 Issue 2 – 2011: 109 - 118

10.1080/10400419.2011.571183

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Sharing Reliability, Validity, and Factor Structure of the Imaginative Capability Scale via BrowZine

Reliability, Validity, and Factor Structure of the Imaginative Capability Scale
Liang, Chaoyun; Chia, Tsorng-Lin
Creativity Research Journal, Vol. 26 Issue 1 – 2014: 106 - 114

10.1080/10400419.2014.873671

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Mapping Creativity: Creativity Measurements Network Analysis
Pinheiro, Igor Reszka; Cruz, Roberto Moraes
Creativity Research Journal, Vol. 26 Issue 3 – 2014: 263 - 275

10.1080/10400419.2014.929404

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Research Confirms a Link between Intelligence and Life Expectancy



Research Confirms a Link between Intelligence and Life Expectancy

People are living longer than ever. According to a 2015 World Health Organization report, Japanese live the longest, with an average…

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Sunday, December 20, 2015

The perfect holiday gift: The CHC periodic table of cognitive elements T-shirts

Back by popular demand, the blogmaster has created a new and improved CHC Theory Periodic Table of Human Cognitive Elements figure!  It is shown below.  Future updates will provide links to the updated definitions that go with each cognitive element code.  This new CHC periodic table represents the latest iteration of the CHC taxonomy of human cognitive abilities as summarized in the  WJ IV Technical Manual.

Even more exciting is that you can now purchase a t-shirt with the CHC Periodic Table printed on the front, with the title "The CHC Periodic Table:  What are you made of?"  You can find it here or go to the blog roll and click on IQs Corner Skreened blog badge.

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Sharing The effects of language bias and cultural bias estimated using the method of correlated vectors on a large database of IQ comparisons between native Dutch and ethnic minority immigrants from non-Western countries via BrowZine

The effects of language bias and cultural bias estimated using the method of correlated vectors on a large database of IQ comparisons between native Dutch and ethnic minority immigrants from non-Western countries
te Nijenhuis, Jan; Willigers, Denise; Dragt, Joep; van der Flier, Henk
Intelligence, Vol. 54 – 2016: 117 - 135

10.1016/j.intell.2015.12.003

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Role of mental abilities and mental tests in explaining high-school grades
Cucina, Jeffrey M.; Peyton, Sharron T.; Su, Chihwei; Byle, Kevin A.
Intelligence, Vol. 54 – 2016: 90 - 104

10.1016/j.intell.2015.11.007

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Sharing It's getting bigger all the time: Estimating the Flynn effect from secular brain mass increases in Britain and Germany via BrowZine

It's getting bigger all the time: Estimating the Flynn effect from secular brain mass increases in Britain and Germany
Woodley of Menie, Michael A.; Peñaherrera, Mateo A.; Fernandes, Heitor B.F.; Becker, David; Flynn, James R.
Learning and Individual Differences, Vol. 45 – 2016: 95 - 100

10.1016/j.lindif.2015.11.004

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We All Hear The World In Our Own Unique Way



We All Hear The World In Our Own Unique Way

In a recent talk delivered at the Falling Walls Conference in Berlin this week, Northwestern University researcher Dr. Nina Kraus introduced an intriguing…

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Friday, December 18, 2015

How Music and Language Shape the Brain



How Music and Language Shape the Brain

EVANSTON, Ill. -- Northwestern University professor Nina Kraus shed light on one of the brain's most complex tasks -- making sense of sound -- during the recent…

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Learning Soft Skills In Childhood Can Prevent Harder Problems Later

Beyond IQ

Learning Soft Skills In Childhood Can Prevent Harder Problems Later

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Academic learning is usually in the spotlight at school, but teaching elementary-age students "soft" skills like self-control and…

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Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Temporal g and the temporal resoultion hypotheses support brain clock concept: An OBG post






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[This is an OBG post (oldie but goodie post) that was first posted June 29, 2009 at IQs Corner sister blog - the Brain Clock blog]



I've previously blogged, with considerable excitement, about recent research that has suggested that the temporal resolution of one's internal "brain clock" may be more closely associated with intelligence scholars search for the neural underpinnings of general intelligence (g). Traditionally, and overwhelmingly, intelligence scholars have studied and focused on mental reaction time, largely based on the seminal work of Arthur Jensen. Then, along came recent research led primarily by mental timing scholar Rammsayer and colleagues...research that suggested that temporal g (vs. reaction time g) may be more important in attempts to identify the underlying mechanism of neural efficiency.. the focus of the search for the "holy grail" of general intelligence for decades.

The following just published journal article continues to add to the evidence that temporal processing, temporal g, and/or temporal resolution, may be critically important in understanding human intellectual performance. Below is the article reference, abstract, and my paraphrased comments from a reading of the article.
  • Troche, S. & Rammsayer, T. (2009). Temporal and non-temporal sensory discrimination and their predictions of capacity-and speed-related aspects of psychometric intelligence. Personality and Individual Differences,47, 52–57

Abstract
The temporal resolution power hypothesis explains individual differences in psychometric intelligence in terms of temporal acuity of the brain. This approach was supported by high correlations between temporal discrimination and psychometric intelligence. Psychometric intelligence, however, was frequently found to be related to non-temporal discrimination (e.g., frequency, intensity, brightness discrimination). The present study investigated 100 female and 100 male participants with the aim to elucidate the functional relations between psychometric intelligence and temporal and non-temporal discrimination ability. Supporting the assumption of dissociable mechanisms, non-temporal discrimination predicted directly capacity – but not speed-related aspects of psychometric intelligence whereas temporal discrimination predicted both aspects. A substantial correlation between temporal and non-temporal discrimination suggested that general discrimination ability might account for the relations of psychometric intelligence to temporal and non-temporal discrimination abilities. Findings point to an internal structure of general discrimination ability with some dimensions of discrimination more predictive to certain aspects of psychometric intelligence than others.
Introduction/background summary

The neural efficiency hypothesis, based on Jensen's model of neuronal oscillations, has stood front and center as the defacto explanation of individual differences in processing speed and psychometric intelligence. This model suggests that individuals differ in the rate of rate of oscillation between refractory and excitatory states of neurons. The efficiency of oscillation rate, in turn, determines the speed/efficiency of transmission of neurally encoded information. The bottom line is that individuals with higher neural oscillate rates are believed to process information more efficiently, which leads to better intellectual performance.

In contrast, according to the articles authors, the more recent "temporal resolution power (TRP) hypothesis also refers to a hypothetical oscillatory process in the brain to account for the relationship between efficiency and speed of information processing as well as psychometric intelligence (Rammsayer & Brandler, 2002, 2007). According to this view, higher neural temporal resolution leads to faster information processing and to better coordination of mental operations resulting in better performance on intelligence tests. Rammsayer and Brandler (2002) proposed that psychophysical timing tasks, assessing temporal sensitivity and timing accuracy, are the most direct behavioral measures of TRP. The TRP hypothesis has been supported by subsequent studies which found substantial correlations between psychometric intelligence and timing performance (Helmbold, Troche, & Rammsayer, 2006, 2007; Rammsayer &  Brandler, 2007)." Most of these studies have been described previously at the IQ Brain Clock blog under the label temporal g.

An important issue for the TRP hypothesis to address is the fact that the most frequently used mental timing tasks also imply some form of simple sensory discrimination (together with the timing component). In order for the TRP hypothesis to have merit, the model must address (explain) the established relation between sensory discrimination and psychometric (tested) intelligence not only for the temporal domain but also for other non-temporal sensory dimensions. As summarized by the author, "associations with psychometric intelligence were shown for color (r = .08 to r = .32; Acton & Schroeder, 2001), pitch (r = .42 to r = .54; Raz, Willerman, & Yama, 1987), or texture and shape in the tactile modality (r = .08 to r = .29; Stankov, Seizova-Cajic´, & Roberts, 2001)."

Purpose of study

The purpose of the current study was to disentangle the relations between temporal processing and sensory discrimination via the evaluation and testing of two different structural models. As described by the authors, "the first model expanded the investigation of Helmbold et al. (2006) to the level of latent variables by factorizing various non-temporal and temporal discrimination tasks. It is assumed that temporal and non-temporal discrimination abilities predict psychometric intelligence as two disocciable factors which, however, can be related to each other. The TRP hypothesis postulates that TRP affects both capacity- and speed-related aspects of psychometric intelligence (Helmbold & Rammsayer, 2006)."

Alternatively "Model 2 proceeds from Spearman’s (1904) assumption that a general discrimination ability predicts psychometric intelligence. In accordance with this view, temporal discrimination constitutes a factor indicsociable from non-temporal discrimination. In other words, temporal and non-temporal discrimination tasks build a common factor referred to as GDA."

Method summary

The subjects were 100 male and 100 female volunteers (18 to 30 years of age; mean ± SD = 22.2 ± 3.3 years). The sample comprised 93 university students, 89 vocational school students and apprentices, while the remaining participants were working individuals of different professions. All participants reported normal hearing and normal or corrected-to-normal sight. The authors employed structural equation modeling (SEM) methods to evaluate and compare the two models.

Capacity and speed components of psychometric IQ (g) were measured with 12 subtests of the Berlin model of intelligence structure (BIS) test (Jäger, Süß & Beauducel, 1997). Four temporal (temporal generalization, duration, temporal-order judgment, rhythm perception) and three non-temporal sensory discrimination tasks (pitch discrimination, intensity discrimination, rightness discrimination) were used to operationally define temporal processing and sensory discrimination, respectively.


Conclusions/discussion summary (emphasis added by blogmaster)

Evaluation and comparison of the two models suggested the following conclusions (as per the authors)
  • The relation between non-temporal discrimination and speed was completely mediated by temporal discrimination. The association between temporal discrimination and capacity was twofold. There was a weak but reliable direct association as well as a stronger indirect relation mediated by non-temporal discrimination.
  • Although Model 1 revealed a high correlation between temporal and non-temporal discrimination, the different relations of temporal and non-temporal discrimination to speed and capacity suggest that the two factors are disocciable. Our finding of a strong correlational link between temporal discrimination ability and psychometric intelligence is in line with the outcome of previous studies investigating the TRP hypothesis...according to this account, higher TRP entails increased speed and efficiency of information processing resulting in higher scores on both speed- and capacity-related intelligence tests. Thus, our finding that Model 1 fitted the data well is in line with the TRP hypothesis.
  • The present results corroborate Helmbold and Rammsayer’s (2006) finding of a stronger relationship between temporal discrimination ability and capacity compared to speed. On the contrary, shared variance with non-temporal discrimination accounted for the association between capacity and temporal discrimination whereas the direct link between temporal discrimination and capacity was rather weak. Thus, the strong relation between TRP and psychometric intelligence is probably due to the fact that TRP, when measured as a factor derived from temporal discrimination tasks, taps both temporal and unspecific discrimination abilities. From this perspective, time-related aspects of TRP may account for the association to speed whereas rather unspecific discrimination-related aspects mainly account for the association with capacity.
  • The more parsimonious Model 2 should be preferred over Model 1. Model 2 suggests that temporal and non-temporal discrimination tasks constitute a common factor of unspecific, general discrimination performance referred to as GDA. The close association between this factor and psychometric intelligence is supported by the outcome of previous studies.
  • The finding, that both temporal and non-temporal discrimination share a common source, supports the notion that general discrimination ability is somehow associated with higher-order mental ability.
  • The finding of a close association between GDA and psychometric intelligence suggests, that already at a very early sensory stage of information processing, higher neural efficiency can be observed as a correlate of psychometric intelligence
  • The high correlations between GDA and speed- as well as capacity-related aspects of psychometric intelligence, as revealed by Model 2, emphasize the importance of sensory performance as a correlate of higher-order mental ability. Nevertheless, differential relations between temporal and non-temporal discrimination and aspects of psychometric intelligence, as suggested by Model 1, may help to elucidate the internal structure of GDA. This is, certain sensory processes appear to be more predictive for certain aspects of psychometric intelligence than others. Such a conclusion is in line with the results of Stankov et al. (2001) who reported differential relations between cognitive abilities and aspects of tactile and kinesthetic perceptual processing. In the face of the available data, mapping of differential relationships between distinct sensory performances and components of psychometric intelligence represent a promising strategy to further explore the significance of sensory processes for human mental abilities.

Bottom line: This study continues to support the importance of temporal g, temporal processing, or the TRP hypothesis in explaining neural efficiency, which in turn is believed to play a major role in facilitating better (higher) intellectual performance. Understanding the intenral IQ Brain Clock, and interventions/treatments that may help "fine tune" the brain clock (increase its timing resolution), appears an important avenue to pursue both for theoretical and applied (cognitive enhancement interventions) research. To pat myself on the back, I've previously summarized the potential link between increased resolution of the brain clock and higher cognitive functioning in prior professional presentations (click here to visit a SlideShare PPT show)

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When Phrenology Was Used in Court



When Phrenology Was Used in Court

In the 1830s, phrenology was just beginning to garner the veneer of legitimacy.Image by Slate, illustration via Library of Congress In November 1834, a 9-year-old boy…

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Monday, December 14, 2015

WJ IV "Essentials" cognitive book due out this April 2016

I've received a number of emails re: possible books on interpretation of the WJ IV Cognitive battery.  The best available book will be out this coming spring.  Click here for more info.  Kuduos to the authors


The following description was provided by Dr. Fred Schrank

The much-anticipated Essentials of WJ IV Cognitive Abilities Assessment is scheduled for publication in March, 2016. The lead authors are Fred Schrank, Scott Decker, and John Garruto. This authoritative resource for use and interpretation of the WJ IV COG begins with a discussion of the evolution of the Woodcock-Johnson cognitive battery from 1977, progresses to the interpretive plan of the current edition, and provides a concise perspective on the evolution of contemporary CHC theory that is so closely associated with the WJ IV COG. Expanded guidance on administration and scoring is provided by Melanie Bartels Graw, whose contributions reflect more than 25 years of experience in development and publication of the Woodcock-Johnson tests. An extensive interpretive chapter by WJ IV author Fredrick Schrank weaves contemporary neuro-cognitive research with CHC theory to effect an understanding of what each test and cluster measures and how limitations measured in specific tests can be addressed with targeted interventions or accommodations. Robert Walrath, John Willis, and Ron Dumont give a balanced critique of the WJ IV COG’s strengths and weaknesses and whole-heartedly endorse the battery for use in a wide variety of clinical and educational settings. Scott Decker applies his expertise in neuropsychological assessment to several case studies that demonstrate the different levels of WJ IV COG interpretation. John Garruto’s case studies contribute the perspective of a practicing school psychologist in use and interpretation of the WJ IV COG. A special appendix by the WJ IV authors (Schrank, McGrew, & Mather) helps clarify the purposes and usefulness of the Gf-Gc Composite for evaluation of specific learning disabilities.  In summary, the Essentials of WJ IV Cognitive Abilities Assessment goes beyond the information provided in the WJ IV manuals and bulletins to provide a single, easy-to-understand resource for using the WJ IV COG in contemporary assessment practice.

Saturday, December 12, 2015

Reseach byte: Working memory training (Gwm) may improve emotion regulation ability

Working memory training improves emotion regulation ability: Evidence from HRV


Highlights

The training group's working memory capacity was increased after training.
The HF-HRV in emotion regulation condition was enhanced by training.
Working memory training improves emotion regulation ability.

Abstract

Emotion regulation during social situations plays a pivotal role in health and interpersonal functioning. In this study, we propose a working memory training approach to improve emotion regulation ability. This training promotes an updating function that is a crucial modulated process for emotion regulation. In the present study, the participants in the training group completed a running memory task over 20 days of training. Their working memory capability and high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) data on pretest and posttest were assessed and analyzed. Compared with the control group, the training group's reaction time in the 2-back working memory task was reduced significantly. In addition, the HF-HRV in the emotion regulation condition was increased after the 20-day training, which indicates that the working memory training effect could transfer to emotion regulation. In other words, working memory training improved emotion regulation ability.

Keywords

  • Emotion regulation;
  • Working memory training;
  • High-frequency HRV;
  • Attention control

Friday, December 11, 2015

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Storing Verbal Information in Working Memory
Camos, V.
Current Directions in Psychological Science, Vol. 24 Issue 6 – 2015: 440 - 445

10.1177/0963721415606630

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Sharing Childhood characteristics and participation in Scottish Mental Survey 1947 6-Day Sample Follow-ups: Implications for participation in aging studies via BrowZine

Childhood characteristics and participation in Scottish Mental Survey 1947 6-Day Sample Follow-ups: Implications for participation in aging studies
Johnson, Wendy; Brett, Caroline E.; Calvin, Catherine; Deary, Ian J.
Intelligence, Vol. 54 – 2016: 70 - 79

10.1016/j.intell.2015.11.006

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Thursday, December 10, 2015

IQ Flynn Effect Atkins MR/ID Archive updated today: 12-10-15


The Atkins MR/ID Capital Punishment Flynn Effect Archive was updated today (12-11-15).  11 new articles have been added.  A description of the archive and links to accessing the material can be found in a prior post at the ICDP blog.

NIH/NIA research grant awarded to study Interactive Metronome (IM) intervention with aging Native American Indians


I borrowed the announcement below from the Interactive Metronome IM-Home blog.  As many of my readers know, I am a paid external consultant to IM (see conflict of interest disclosure statement).  I have been interested in the IM technology for slightly more than 9 years.  As I blogged yesterday, there is considerable IM research literature available, including 7 "gold standard" randomized control design (RCD) efficacy studies.  Yesterday's posts provide links to key IM and mental timing resources.  I will provide updates regarding this grant project as I learn more.

 Announcement from Interactive Metronome

The National Institutes of Health through the National Institute on Aging has awarded a grant of $2,000,000 to study the effects of Interactive Metronome® (IM) therapy on aging American Indians. The three-year study, which will be conducted by the University of New Mexico and the University of Washington, aims to determine whether the IM intervention can improve cognitive and motor functioning among older American Indians.

American Indians (AIs) experience a disproportionately high incidence of cerebrovascular disease (CBVD) relative to non American Indians with twice the stroke rate of the general US population. Neuroimaging techniques have shown CBVD-related brain abnormalities to be associated with disruption of neuropsychological performance. Therapy for post-stroke cognitive impairment has been challenging. Cognitive therapy involves intense, focused, regular mental activity, intellectual stimulation, and behavioral exercises that assist individuals to regain or maintain cognitive function and reduce the risk of age-related cognitive decline and dementia after brain injury. Interactive Metronome® therapy is a promising form of behavioral therapy for CBVD-related cognitive and motor function. This technology uses operant conditioning of an individual’s responses through simple, repetitive motor tasks (e.g., clapping hands, tapping feet) in sync with a set beat. Through visual and auditory feedback, IM addresses processing speed, attention, and immediate and delayed memory, all of which can be affected by CBVD. IM therapy can improve quality of life, physical mobility, gait, balance and CBVD-related cognitive deficits.

This study’s findings will provide important insights into the relationship among cognitive and motor rehabilitation, neuropsychological assessment, and brain abnormalities in the American Indian who suffers from CBVD. These results will reveal if IM is a viable treatment option for reducing post-stroke challenges in not only American Indians but the general aging population as well.

Wednesday, December 09, 2015

Interactive Metronome (IM) efficacy: Results of randomized experimental-control group designs


For those interested in the efficacy of Interactive Metronome, as demonstrated by the "gold standard" randomized control-experimental group designs (RCD), I have made a post at IQs Corner sister blog--the Brain Clock blog.


Article: Brain Connections Predict How Well You Can Pay Attention

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Brain Connections Predict How Well You Can Pay Attention

During a 1959 television appearance, Jack Kerouac was asked how long it took him to write his novel On The Road. His response – three weeks – amazed…

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Tuesday, December 08, 2015

Flynn effect methodological issues: Special issue of the Journal of Intelligence

Special Issue "Methodological Advances in Understanding the Flynn Effect

Access to this open access journal can be found here.
Quicklinks
A special issue of Journal of Intelligence (ISSN 2079-3200).
Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Submission
Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.
Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Intelligence is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.
Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joseph Lee Rodgers
Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Peabody, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
Website: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/psychological_sciences/bio/joe-rodgers













Monday, December 07, 2015

Video: Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman on introversion/extroversion, personality, and the default brain network

Excellent and thought provoking video presentation by my friend and colleague Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman.  Kudos Scott


Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman, Scientific Director at the Imagination Institute, University of Pennsylvania
https://vimeo.com/148154516

Related topics: University of Pennsylvania, Imagination

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Saturday, December 05, 2015

Sharing Construct validity of complex problem solving: A comprehensive view on different facets of intelligence and school grades via BrowZine

Construct validity of complex problem solving: A comprehensive view on different facets of intelligence and school grades
Kretzschmar, André; Neubert, Jonas C.; Wüstenberg, Sascha; Greiff, Samuel
Intelligence, Vol. 54 – 2016: 55 - 69

10.1016/j.intell.2015.11.004

University of Minnesota Users:
http://login.ezproxy.lib.umn.edu/login?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289615001634

Non-University of Minnesota Users: (Full text may not be available)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289615001634

Accessed with BrowZine, supported by University of Minnesota.

Article: Do Bilingual People Have a Cognitive Advantage? - Neuroskeptic

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Do Bilingual People Have a Cognitive Advantage? - Neuroskeptic

By Neuroskeptic | December 4, 2015 12:54 pm For years, psychologists have been debating the "bilingual advantage" – the idea that speaking more than…

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Read it on blogs.discovermagazine.com




Friday, December 04, 2015

Article: Charisma Linked to Quick Thinking (Gs?)

High Gs makes one more charismatic?  Hmmmmm

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Charisma Linked to Quick Thinking

Quick thinking seems to be the main trait that charismatic people have in common, according to a new study published in Psychological Science.The…

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Read it on psychcentral.com




Tuesday, December 01, 2015

Positive Cogmed working memory training study in math and reading

Front Psychol. 2015; 6: 1711.
Published online 2015 Nov 10. doi:  10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01711
PMCID: PMC4639603

Working Memory Training is Associated with Long Term Attainments in Math and Reading

Abstract

Training working memory (WM) using computerized programs has been shown to improve functions directly linked to WM such as following instructions and attention. These functions influence academic performance, which leads to the question of whether WM training can transfer to improved academic performance. We followed the academic performance of two age-matched groups during 2 years. As part of the curriculum in grade 4 (age 9–10), all students in one classroom (n = 20) completed Cogmed Working Memory Training (CWMT) whereas children in the other classroom (n = 22) received education as usual. Performance on nationally standardized tests in math and reading was used as outcome measures at baseline and two years later. At baseline both classes were normal/high performing according to national standards. At grade 6, reading had improved to a significantly greater extent for the training group compared to the control group (medium effect size, Cohen’s d = 0.66, p = 0.045). For math performance the same pattern was observed with a medium effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.58) reaching statistical trend levels (p = 0.091). Moreover, the academic attainments were found to correlate with the degree of improvements during training (p < 0.053). This is the first study of long-term (>1 year) effects of WM training on academic performance. We found performance on both reading and math to be positively impacted after completion of CWMT. Since there were no baseline differences between the groups, the results may reflect an influence on learning capacity, with improved WM leading to a boost in students’ capacity to learn. This study is also the first to investigate the effects of CWMT on academic performance in typical or high achieving students. The results suggest that WM training can help optimize the academic potential of high performers.
Keywords: working memory training, academic attainment, cognitive training, cogmed, educational psychology

Mind wandering greater when doing massed learning (cramming) when compared to spaced-out learning

People Mind Wander More During Massed Than Spaced Inductive Learning.Metcalfe, Janet; Xu, Judy Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Nov 30 , 2015, No Pagination Specified. http://dx.doi.org.ezp1.lib.umn.edu/10.1037/xlm0000216 Abstract This article investigates the relation between mind wandering and the spacing effect in inductive learning. Participants studied works of art by different artists grouped in blocks, where works by a particular artist were either presented all together successively (the massed condition), or interleaved with the works of other artists (the spaced condition). The works of 24 artists were shown, with 12, 15, or 18 works by each artist being provided as exemplars. Later, different works by the same artists were presented for a test of the artists’ identity. During the course of studying these works, participants were probed for mind wandering. It was found that people mind wandered more when the exemplars were presented in a massed rather than in a spaced manner, especially as the task progressed. There was little mind wandering and little difference between massed and spaced conditions toward the beginning of study. People were better able to correctly attribute the new works to the appropriate artist (inductive learning) when (a) they were in the spaced condition and (b) they had not been mind wandering. This research suggests that inductive learning may be influenced by mind wandering and that the impairment in learning with massed practice (compared to spaced practice) may be attributable, at least in part, to attentional factors—people are “on task” less fully when the stimuli are massed rather than spaced. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)