Monday, June 30, 2014

Time for some fluid intelligence (Gf): Back by popular demand...the Gf coffee mug

Back by popular demand (click here for a post from 2005 - and an interesting historical note about Jack Carroll's fondness for this Gf cup), the Gf coffee mug...with the two important fluid intelligence narrow abilities not formally included in the CHC taxonomy.  Click here if you want to join the Gf "fluid" intelligence club :)


Friday, June 27, 2014

Notes from “Think Like a Freak” by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner


June 27, 2014
1. What Does It Mean to Think Like a Freak?

Knowing what to measure, and how to measure it, can make a complicated world less so. There is nothing like the sheer power of numbers to scrub away layers of confusion and contradiction, especially with emotional, hot-button topics.

All Excerpts From

Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner. "Think Like a Freak." iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.




Notes from “Think Like a Freak” by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner


June 27, 2014
1. What Does It Mean to Think Like a Freak?

The fact is that solving problems is hard. If a given problem still exists, you can bet that a lot of people have already come along and failed to solve it. Easy problems evaporate; it is the hard ones that linger. Furthermore, it takes a lot of time to track down, organize, and analyze the data to answer even one small question well.

All Excerpts From

Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner. "Think Like a Freak." iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.



Announcing v1.0 of the Woodcock-Johnson IV Evolving Web of Knowledge (WJ IV EWOK)

 http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4391/914/320/ewok.2.jpg
I am pleased to announce the new WJ IV Evolving Web of Knowledge (WJ IV EWOK), your one stop internet source for keeping abreast re: announcements, research, etc. regarding the new Woodcock-Johnson IV Battery.  It is the same concept used for the prior WJ III EWOK

You can start your navigation and exploration by clicking here.

If you have information that is relevant and you think should be included in the next update, send to the blogmaster (iap@earthlink.net).

[Conflict of interest closure:  I am a coauthor of the WJ III and WJ IV].

The CHC Taxonomy of Human Cognitive Abilities Codebooks---two slide shows

The latest CHC cognitive ability codebook information is available in these two slide shows. PDF copies of each presentation can be downloaded here and here.


Sharing Training brain networks and states via BrowZine

Training brain networks and states
Tang, Yi-Yuan; Posner, Michael I.
Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 18 Issue 7 – 2014: 345 - 350

10.1016/j.tics.2014.04.002

University of Minnesota Users:
https://www.lib.umn.edu/log.phtml?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364661314000849

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Article: Screening for autism: There’s an app for that




PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU) [feedly]



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PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)
// Neuroethics & Law Blog

Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): In Defense of Brain Imaging, National Geographic In The Popular Press: I Had Alice in Wonderland Syndrome, New York Times Well Blog Should you read more because a neuroscientist said so?, The Neuroethics Blog Cool...
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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

The WJ IV Battery: Select Technical and Psychometric Information Overview. A Slide show


Sharing Cognitive Tests in Early Childhood: Psychometric and Cultural Considerations via BrowZine

Cognitive Tests in Early Childhood: Psychometric and Cultural Considerations
Williams, M. E.; Sando, L.; Soles, T. G.
Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, Vol. 32 Issue 5 – 2014: 455 - 476

10.1177/0734282913517526

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Sharing Gender differences in scholastic achievement: A meta-analysis. via BrowZine

Gender differences in scholastic achievement: A meta-analysis.
Voyer, Daniel; Voyer, Susan D.
Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 140 Issue 4 – 2014: 1174 - 1204

10.1037/a0036620

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Cognitive ability testing: The big picture perspective. A slide show


A CHC theory SlideShare by Fahad Zafar(09-Arid-609) Mudassar Ellahi(09-Arid-632) and Waqar Muhammad Khan(09-Arid-678


CHC Theory 101: From g to CHC slideshow


The WJ IV: Introduction and Overview slideshow

I just learned that I can embed my SlideShare shows directly into blog posts...hot dog. Here is the last one I had uploaded to SlideShare. I will be adding others, and they will all have the key label "slide shows" so all can eventually be accessed by clicking on the "slide show" in the labels section of the blog roll on the right side of my blogs

Monday, June 23, 2014

Gender differences in scholastic achievement: A meta-analysis. [feedly]



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Gender differences in scholastic achievement: A meta-analysis.
// Psychological Bulletin - Vol 136, Iss 4

A female advantage in school marks is a common finding in education research, and it extends to most course subjects (e.g., language, math, science), unlike what is found on achievement tests. However, questions remain concerning the quantification of these gender differences and the identification of relevant moderator variables. The present meta-analysis answered these questions by examining studies that included an evaluation of gender differences in teacher-assigned school marks in elementary, junior/middle, or high school or at the university level (both undergraduate and graduate). The final analysis was based on 502 effect sizes drawn from 369 samples. A multilevel approach to meta-analysis was used to handle the presence of nonindependent effect sizes in the overall sample. This method was complemented with an examination of results in separate subject matters with a mixed-effects meta-analytic model. A small but significant female advantage (mean d = 0.225, 95% CI [0.201, 0.249]) was demonstrated for the overall sample of effect sizes. Noteworthy findings were that the female advantage was largest for language courses (mean d = 0.374, 95% CI [0.316, 0.432]) and smallest for math courses (mean d = 0.069, 95% CI [0.014, 0.124]). Source of marks, nationality, racial composition of samples, and gender composition of samples were significant moderators of effect sizes. Finally, results showed that the magnitude of the female advantage was not affected by year of publication, thereby contradicting claims of a recent "boy crisis" in school achievement. The present meta-analysis demonstrated the presence of a stable female advantage in school marks while also identifying critical moderators. Implications for future educational and psychological research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
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White matter matters: Brain synchronization via the brain's information subway

Check out post at IQ's Corner sister blog, the Brain Clock, for interesting information on the increasing recognition of the importance of white matter tract integrity and functioning for efficient brain synchronization.

WJ IV Battery Revision: Brief Introduction and Overview SlideShare Show Posted

I just posted a brief introduction and overview SlideShare regarding the new WJ IV battery (that was released this month).  The slideshow does contain some of the same slides that were in three prior slideshows posted from the WJ IV NASP 2014 workshop by myself, and Dr.'s Schrank and Mather.  This module serves as a general purpose introduction and overview.   Additional slideshows will be posted in the future that deal with specific topics, features, data, etc. in greater depth.

[Conflict of interest disclosure:  I am a coauthor of the WJ III and WJ IV.]




Friday, June 20, 2014

Article: Study: For cognitive training to work, it must induce neuroplasticity in brain networks that matter


Study: For cognitive training to work, it must induce neuroplasticity in brain networks that matter
http://sharpbrains.com/blog/2014/05/12/study-for-cognitive-training-to-work-it-must-induce-neuroplasticity-in-brain-networks-that-matter

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Sharing Functional correlates of the speech-in-noise perception impairment in dyslexia: An MRI study via BrowZine

Functional correlates of the speech-in-noise perception impairment in dyslexia: An MRI study
Dole, Marjorie; Meunier, Fanny; Hoen, Michel
Neuropsychologia, Vol. 60 – 2014: 103 - 114

10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.05.016

University of Minnesota Users:
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Sharing The unitary ability of IQ in the WISC-IV and its computation via BrowZine

The unitary ability of IQ in the WISC-IV and its computation
Orsini, Arturo; Pezzuti, Lina; Hulbert, Sabina
Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 69 – 2014: 173 - 175

10.1016/j.paid.2014.05.023

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https://www.lib.umn.edu/log.phtml?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886914003079

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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Gc as higher order factor including other knowledge systems (verbal, Gq, Grw, Gkn, etc).

Interesting new study that provides some support for our (Schneider & McGrew, 2012 - largely the brilliance of Joel Schneider) conceptualization of Gc as a higher stratum factor, consistent with Cattell's provincial power gc, that includes language/verbal abilities, reading abilities (Grw), quantitative knowledge (Gq), domain-specific knowledge (Gkn), and possible other sources of knowledge. Our figure is at the end of this post. Click on images to enlarge.








Article: Brain imaging shows enhanced executive brain function in people with musical training


Brain imaging shows enhanced executive brain function in people with musical training
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617211020.htm

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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Friday, June 13, 2014

The CHC Periodic Table of Cognitive Elements: "What are you made of?" Now available on a t-shirt

Back by popular demand, the blogmaster has created a new and improved CHC Theory Periodic Table of Human Cognitive Elements figure!  It is shown below.  Future updates will provide links to the updated definitions that go with each cognitive element code.  This new CHC periodic table represents the latest iteration of the CHC taxonomy of human cognitive abilities as summarized in the forthcoming WJ IV Technical Manual.

Even more exciting is that you can now purchase a t-shirt with the CHC Periodic Table printed on the front, with the title "The CHC Periodic Table:  What are you made of?"  You can find it here or go to the blog roll and click on IQs Corner Skreened blog badge.  More to come:)

Click on images to enlarge




Monday, June 09, 2014

Article: How your "working memory" makes sense of the world



PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU) [feedly]


PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)
// Neuroethics & Law Blog

Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): The Divide Over Involuntary Mental Health Treatment, National Public Radio In The Popular Press: 'Free choice' in primates altered through brain stimulation, Science Daily Flashes of light show how memories are made, Nature News Can...
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Assessing the Flynn Effect in the Wechsler scales. [feedly]



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Assessing the Flynn Effect in the Wechsler scales.
// Journal of Individual Differences - Vol 31, Iss 2

The current study examined the Flynn Effect (i.e., the increase in IQ scores over time) across all editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC), and Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI). By reverse engineering the correlation and scale score transformations from each Wechsler edition's technical manual, we made a mean and covariance matrix using the subtests and age groups that were in common for all editions of a given instrument. The results indicated that when aggregated, there was a FE of 0.44 IQ points/year. This Wechsler instrument used, however, moderates the FE, with the WISC showing the largest FE (0.73 IQ points/year) and the WAIS showing a smallest FE (0.30 IQ points/year). Moreover, this study found that the amount of invariant indicators across instruments and age groups varied substantially, ranging from 51.53% in the WISC for the 7-year-old group to 10.00% in the WPPSI for the 5- and 5.5-year-old age groups. Last, we discuss future direction for FE research based on these results. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
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******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Gs->working memory->Gf developmental-differential psych developmental cascade model

Very interesting research that suggests a developmental (neo-Piagetian) wrinkle to the developmental cascade model, a model that has shown that Gs influences working memory (Gwm), and working memory in turn influences Gf (but Gs has no direct influencee on Gf).
[Click on images to enlarge]

"However, the exact role of speed and working memory is still debated. Some researchers emphasize speed as a purer index of the quality of information processing in the brain (e.g., Jensen, 1998). This interpretation is based on studies which estimate the relation between speed and intelligence without involving working memory. Others emphasize working memory because it is the workspace of thinking (Kyllonen & Christal, 1990). Studies emphasizing working memory usually measure all three constructs in young adults, when working memory is the dominant predictor of Gf, according to the patterns to be described below. Finally, others assume a causal linear relation between them such that changes in speed cause changes (or differences) in working memory which, in turn, cause changes (or differences) in Gf (Case, 1985; Coyle, Pillow, Snyder, & Kochunov, 2011; Kail, 1991; Kail & Ferrer, 2007). However, this chain of relations may only reflect the fact that working memory tasks are both timed, like speed tasks, and require information management, like Gf tasks, rather than a causal sequence. In fact, there is evidence that control of attention is common to all, speed, WM, and Gf, explaining their relations (Cowan, Morey, Chen, & Bunting, 2007; Engle et al., 1999; Stankov & Roberts, 1997)"

Note. Attentional control (AC) is now proposed to represent a narrow ability under the broad CHC domain of Gwm (short-term working memory) by the authors of the forthcoming WJ IV [Conflict of interest disclosure--I am one of the coauthors of the WJ III and WJ IV). This is consistent with Schneider and McGrew's (2012) recent book chapter CHC model update.

[Click on images to enlarge]

"Demetriou et al. (2013) showed recently that the relations between these constructs are more complicated than originally assumed, because they vary with growth. Specifically, speed increases and WM expands. Gf evolves along a reconceptuali-zation sequence (ReConceP) where changes in the nature of representations alternate with changes in the command and interlinking of representations constructed earlier."

"These patterns provide support for an integrated developmental–differential theory of intelligence that would explicate why Gf changes coalesce with speed at the beginning of developmental cycles and with WM changes at the end. Gf undergoes three types of change: representational, inferential, and complexity."

I previously presented (McGrew, 2005) support for the developmental cascade model in 5 age-differentiated WJ III norm samples (see one of the sample models below). Instead of causal models with Gf as the criterion, I specified a criterion g-factor defined by Gv, Ga, Glr, Gf, and Gc. The results strongly supported the Gwm->g link, and significant causal links from Gs to working memory. Gs did not dispaly a direct link to g in the childhood samples, but did demonstrate small significant direct paths to g in the adolescent and adult samples.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 07, 2014

More research on the validity of the C-LIM framework in intelligence testing

Another article adding to the Cultural-Linquistic Interpretive Matrix research literature. Click on images to enlarge. A copy of the article can be found here.

"Conclusion

The primary conclusion drawn from this study and previous research is that linguistic demand is an important consideration when selecting and interpreting tests of cognitive abilities. The implications of this study go beyond a re-classification of the C-LIM to emphasizing one of the underlying motivations of the C-LIM's initial inception—the importance of considering a student's linguistic background and abilities prior to selecting, administering, and interpreting tests of cognitive abilities. A comprehensive evaluation that takes a student's linguistic ability into consideration should consider that a student's language ability (i.e., conversational proficiency) might not be an accurate representation of a student's academic language abilities (Cummins, 2008). Thus, it would be beneficial to gather information on a student's academic language abil-ity, due to the relationship between education and IQ (Matarazzo & Herman, 1984). A student's receptive and expressive language abilities may be a worthwhile pursuit in future research, as student's level of conversational proficiency in the classroom may mislead educators and psy-chologists to assume that the student has been exposed to English with the same frequency and depth as his or her peers (Cummins, 2008). Moreover, as suggested by the results of this study, considering the influence of linguistic ability when assessing cognitive abilities should continue to be supported by empirical evidence, instead of school psychologists continuing to rely on informal measures of linguistic ability through language samples and student interviews to gain information on language ability (Ochoa, Galarza, & Gonzalez, 1996).

A second conclusion is that it is unclear how cultural loading can be represented quantitatively in a way that is meaningful both theoretically and practically. An important, albeit unanswered question is, "What variables do practitioners take into account when making decisions about the cultural influences that may affect the selection and interpretation of tests from cognitive batteries?" Flanagan and Ortiz (2001) define cultural loading as "the degree to which a given test requires specific knowledge of or experience with mainstream culture" (p. 243). However, this broad definition does not identify specific variables that practitioners may consider in practice to make these decisions about whether a student's experiences are significantly different from mainstream culture. Given these unanswered questions, it is possible that the underlying reasoning that led to the creation of the C-LIM and its categorization system needs to be re-thought (as also suggested by Styck & Watkins, 2013), particularly with respect to cultural loading. Specifically, it would be important to consider what is occurring and possible in practice, as this is the intended use of the C-LIM."

 

 

Number sense: Two dimensional construct that may either be Gf, Gq or mixed Gf/Gq in CHC taxonomy

 

Very interesting article on the structure of number sense (numerosity) and correlates of the dimensions of number sense. Joel Schneider and I, in our 2012 CHC book chapter, suggest that number sense is likely a new ability that needs to be included in the CHC taxonomy. At this time there is no research I am aware of that helps determine where number sense fits in the CHC taxonomy. As Joel and I have written, we believe it likely would fall under Gq or Gf. It is my current thinking, based on the study featured here and other research I have read, that number sense most likely is a factorially complex ability that will fall under Gq and Gf (RQ). There is likely going to be an increase in standardized measures of number sense (or numerosity) in future individually administered test batteries.
Click on images below to enlarge

"NS at an early age has been denoted as the most important predictor of later mathematics performance: more important than general intelligence, and still present when controlling for other measures such as working memory (e.g., Geary, Hoard, Nugent, & Bailey, 2013; Mazzocco, Feigenson, & Halberda, 2011). Similarly, problems in early NS may precede long-lasting problems in mathematics performance throughout the academic career of a child (Ansari & Karmiloff-Smith, 2002; Butterworth, 2005). In the past decades, research concerning the components of NS, its predictive role for later performance, and the possibilities to remediate delays in NS has been expanded (e.g., Dyson, Jordan, & Glutting, 2013; Toll & Van Luit, 2013a). The present study builds on current understandings of NS and aims to inves-tigate the factor structure of NS and the predictive role of working memory (WM)."

"Although research concerning NS has recently increased, there is limited consensus with regard to its definition. Dehaene (1992, 2001) stressed the intuitive capacity to mentally represent quantities, but other definitions focus on declarative knowledge of numbers, and the ability to compare between and manipulate them, as evidenced by di-verse batteries of quantity-related tests (Jordan, Glutting, Ramineni, & Watkins, 2010; Malofeeva et al., 2004). Also, a limited number of studies have targeted the factors underlying the construct."

"The factor analysis yielded a factor structure of two distinct components. The first component can be characterised as symbolic processing and is primarily based on culture-based taught skills: number recognition, counting, and using number words in a meaningful context. This factor could predict performance on digit knowledge and counting, but also on the symbolic versions of the number comparison and number line test, as formal knowledge of number symbols and words was needed for successful completion of these tasks. The second factor could be characterised as nonsymbolic processing, and primarily indicated the intuitive processing of number and magnitude, quite similar to the influential definition of NS given by Dehaene (2001), who postu-lated that NS is quick and intuitive. This factor could predict performance on both the symbolic and the nonsymbolic comparison and number line tests."

"We found that both symbolic and nonsymbolic processing could be predicted by WM components. However, whereas both the central executive and visuospatial sketchpad could significantly predict symbolic number processing, variance in nonsymbolic processing was only predicted by the central exec-utive, whilst measures of the slave systems added no additional explained variance. Yet, each individual measure of WM did correlate with measures loading onto nonsymbolic NS, highlighting the importance of analysing these associations in integrated models in order to control for shared variance between tasks. The significant associations between symbolic processing and both the central executive and visuospatial sketchpad suggested that to successfully count and use number words and symbols, both visuospatial storage and processing is needed

 

 

 

Is biculturalism a three dimensional construct?

Interesting article suggesting that biculturalism (and not degree of acculturation and enculturation) may be a three dimensional construct. Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

Sharing Introduction to Special Section on Working Memory via BrowZine

Introduction to Special Section on Working Memory
Dehn, M. J.
Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol. 18 Issue 4 – 2014: 283 - 285

10.1177/1087054714523128

University of Minnesota Users:
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Sharing Nonpharmacological Treatments for ADHD: A Meta-Analytic Review via BrowZine

Nonpharmacological Treatments for ADHD: A Meta-Analytic Review
Hodgson, K.; Hutchinson, A. D.; Denson, L.
Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol. 18 Issue 4 – 2014: 275 - 282

10.1177/1087054712444732

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Friday, June 06, 2014

Sharing The Public's Bounded Understanding of Science via BrowZine

The Public's Bounded Understanding of Science
Bromme, Rainer; Goldman, Susan R.
Educational Psychologist, Vol. 49 Issue 2 – 2014: 59 - 69

10.1080/00461520.2014.921572

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Sharing Introduction to the special issue on circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience. via BrowZine

Introduction to the special issue on circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience.
Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.
Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 128 Issue 3 – 2014: 237 - 239

10.1037/a0036740

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Sharing Number sense in kindergarten children: Factor structure and working memory predictors via BrowZine

Number sense in kindergarten children: Factor structure and working memory predictors
Friso-van den Bos, Ilona; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; van Luit, Johannes E.H.
Learning and Individual Differences, Vol. 33 – 2014: 23 - 29

10.1016/j.lindif.2014.05.003

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******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
www.themindhub.com
******************************************************

Article: Brain integration correlates with greater creativity


Brain integration correlates with greater creativity
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/277806.php?tw

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******************************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, Institute for Applied Psychometrics
IAP
******************************************************

Sunday, June 01, 2014

On Death Row With Low I.Q., and New Hope for a Reprieve - NYTimes.com [feedly]




Beyond IQ, a new blog about psychological assessment [feedly]



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Beyond IQ, a new blog about psychological assessment
// Assessing Psyche, Engaging Gauss, Seeking Sophia

Beyond IQ is an excellent new blog about psychological assessment. It was created about a month ago by Smadar Sapir Yogev, an educational psychologist working in Jerusalem.

Smadar Sapir Yogev

Smadar Sapir Yogev

Smadar posts in both Hebrew and in English on a wide range of assessment-related topics. She has created an excellent nine-part series on CHC theory, of which six parts have been published. My favorite in the series so far is the presentation on long-term memory, which presents CHC theory memory abilities alongside other aspects of memory processes identified by cognitive psychologists.

I look forward to reading Smadar's future posts on a diverse range of topics.


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