Monday, September 30, 2013

Article: Developmental trajectories of grey and white matter in dyscalculia


Developmental trajectories of grey and white matter in dyscalculia
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211949313000215

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*******************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, IAP
*******************************************

IQ score differences across time may relfect real changes in the brain

Lay people and many professionals often express consternation when an individuals measured IQ scores are different at different times in their life.  This concern is particularly heightened in high stakes settings where differences in IQ scores can result in changes in eligibility for programs (e.g., social security disability income) or life-or-death decisions (e.g., Atkins MR/ID death penalty cases).

Factors contributing to significant IQ score differences are many (McGrew, in press a) and may include: (a) procedural or test administration errors (e.g., scoring errors; improper nonstandardized test administration; malingering; age vs. grade norms; practice effects), (b) test norm or standardization differences (e.g., norm obsolescence or the Flynn Effect; McGrew, in press b), (c) content differences across different test batteries or between different editions of the same battery, or (d) variations in a person’s performance on different occasions.

 An article "in press" (Neuroimage) by Burgaleta et al. (click here to view copy with annotated comments)  provides the important reminder that differences in IQ scores for an individual (across time) may be due to real changes in general intelligence related to real changes in brain development.  These researchers found that changes in cortical brain thickness were related to changes in IQ scores.  They concluded that "the dynamic nature of intelligence-brain relations...support the idea that changes in IQ across development can reflect meaningful general cognitive ability changes and have a neuroanatomical substrate" (viz., changes in cortical thickness in key brain regions).  The hypothesis was offered that changes in the the cortical areas of  frontoparietal brain network (see P-FIT model of intelligence) may be related to changes in working memory, which in turn has been strongly associated with general reasoning (fluid intelligence; Gf).

The cortical thickness-IQ change relation was deemed consistent with "cellular events that are sensitive to postnatal development and experience."  Possible causal factors suggested included insufficient education or social stimulation during sensitive developmental periods, as well as lifestyle, diet and nutrition, and genetic factors.

  • McGrew, K. S. (in press a).  Intellectual functioning:  Conceptual issues.  In E. Polloway (Ed.), Determining intellectual disability in the courts:  Focus on capital cases.  AAIDD, Washington, DC.

  •  McGrew, K. S. (in press b).  Norm obsolescence:  The Flynn Effect.  In E. Polloway (Ed.), Determining intellectual disability in the courts:  Focus on capital cases.  AAIDD, Washington, DC.


[Click on images to enlarge]








Sunday, September 29, 2013

Friday, September 27, 2013

Article: White matter microstructure correlates of mathematical giftedness and intelligence quotient - Navas-Sánchez - 2013 - Human Brain Mapping




New review regarding human brain clock research and theory [feedly]


 
 
Shared via feedly // published on The Brain Clock Blog // visit site
New review regarding human brain clock research and theory
Hot off the press, in the prestigious Annual Review of Psychology has an excellent review (Allman et al., 2013) of contemporary research and theory regarding many aspects of the human brain clock (brain clock timing; temporal g). I will be adding this to the Key Research Article blogroll section of this blog.

A few images from the article to give an advance peek. [Click on images to enlarge]










Timing intervention improves functioning of soldiers with TBI & new treatment resource for soldiers with TBI

Important and exciting new study just published in the journal Neuropsychology this week. [Click on image to enlarge].  Access available under "IM Research" blogroll at this blog (Brain Clock blog).  Additional information and exciting new treatment resource for soldiers with TBI can be found at the @Attention Fund.

Interactive Metronome Sharp Brains 2013 Virtual Summit - manuscripts mentioned in today's IM expo presentation

Subject: [The Brain Clock Blog] Interactive Metronome Sharp Brains 2013 Virtual Summit - manuscripts mentioned in today's IM expo presentation

Today I am co-presenting on the science of Interactive Metronome at the 2013 Sharp Brains Virtual Summit. I will present a 10 minute overview of the science behind IM (not an easy task given the time constraints). For those who participate in the summit and want access to almost all the articles I mentioned, click here to download a zip file that includes the manuscripts.

--
Posted By Blogger to The Brain Clock Blog at 9/27/2013 07:49:00 AM

Article: Neural Correlates of Musical Creativity: Differences between High and Low Creative Subjects.


Neural Correlates of Musical Creativity: Differences between High and Low Creative Subjects.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24069414?dopt=Abstract

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Thursday, September 26, 2013

@Attention--new treatment for solders with TBI


Article: Mind Wandering: A New Personal Intelligence Perspective



Wisdom from a MacArthur Genius: Psychologist Angela Duckworth on Why Grit, Not IQ, Predicts Success [feedly]

This message is very consistent with the Beyond IQ and Model of Academic Competence and Motivation (MACM) projects that have been blogged about frequently at IQs Corner (see category label sidebar index if this blog) and with special reports at The Mind Hub web portal (www.themindhub.com)
 
 
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Wisdom from a MacArthur Genius: Psychologist Angela Duckworth on Why Grit, Not IQ, Predicts Success

"Character is at least as important as intellect."

Creative history brims with embodied examples of why the secret of genius is doggedness rather than "god"-given talent, from the case of young Mozart's upbringing to E. B. White's wisdom on writing to Chuck Close's assertion about art to Tchaikovsky's conviction about composition to Neil Gaiman's advice to aspiring writers. But it takes a brilliant scholar of the psychology of achievement to empirically prove these creative intuitions: Math-teacher-turned-psychologist Angela Duckworth, who began her graduate studies under positive psychology godfather Martin Seligman at my alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania, has done more than anyone for advancing our understanding of how self-control and grit — the relentless work ethic of sustaining your commitments toward a long-term goal — impact success. So how heartening to hear that Duckworth is the recipient of a 2013 MacArthur "genius" grant for her extraordinary endeavors, the implications of which span from education to employment to human happiness.

In this short video from the MacArthur Foundation, Duckworth traces her journey and explores the essence of her work:

We need more than the intuitions of educators to work on this problem. For sure we need the educators, but in partnership I think we need scientists to study this from different vantage points, and that actually inspired me to move out of the classroom as a teacher and into the lab as a research psychologist.

In the exceedingly excellent How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character (public library) — a necessary addition to these fantastic reads on educationPaul Tough writes of Duckworth's work:

Duckworth had come to Penn in 2002, at the age of thirty-two, later in life than a typical graduate student. The daughter of Chinese immigrants, she had been a classic multitasking overachiever in her teens and twenties. After completing her undergraduate degree at Harvard (and starting a summer school for low-income kids in Cambridge in her spare time), she had bounced from one station of the mid-nineties meritocracy to the next: intern in the White House speechwriting office, Marshall scholar at Oxford (where she studied neuroscience), management consultant for McKinsey and Company, charter-school adviser.

Duckworth spent a number of years toying with the idea of starting her own charter school, but eventually concluded that the model didn't hold much promise for changing the circumstances of children from disadvantaged backgrounds, those whom the education system was failing most tragically. Instead, she decided to pursue a PhD program at Penn. In her application essay, she shared how profoundly the experience of working in schools had changed her view of school reform and wrote:

The problem, I think, is not only the schools but also the students themselves. Here's why: learning is hard. True, learning is fun, exhilarating and gratifying — but it is also often daunting, exhausting and sometimes discouraging. . . . To help chronically low-performing but intelligent students, educators and parents must first recognize that character is at least as important as intellect.

Duckworth began her graduate work by studying self-discipline. But when she completed her first-year thesis, based on a group of 164 eighth-graders from a Philadelphia middle school, she arrived at a startling discovery that would shape the course of her career: She found that the students' self-discipline scores were far better predictors of their academic performance than their IQ scores. So she became intensely interested in what strategies and tricks we might develop to maximize our self-control, and whether those strategies can be taught. But self-control, it turned out, was only a good predictor when it came to immediate, concrete goals — like, say, resisting a cookie. Tough writes:

Duckworth finds it useful to divide the mechanics of achievement into two separate dimensions: motivation and volition. Each one, she says, is necessary to achieve long-term goals, but neither is sufficient alone. Most of us are familiar with the experience of possessing motivation but lacking volition: You can be extremely motivated to lose weight, for example, but unless you have the volition — the willpower, the self-control — to put down the cherry Danish and pick up the free weights, you're not going to succeed. If a child is highly motivated, the self-control techniques and exercises Duckworth tried to teach [the students in her study] might be very helpful. But what if students just aren't motivated to achieve the goals their teachers or parents want them to achieve? Then, Duckworth acknowledges, all the self-control tricks in the world aren't going to help.

This is where grit comes in — the X-factor that helps us attain more long-term, abstract goals. To address this, Duckworth and her colleague Chris Peterson developed the Grit Scale — a deceptively simple test, on which you evaluate how much twelve statements apply to you, from "I am a hard worker" to "New ideas and projects sometimes distract me from previous ones." The results are profoundly predictive of success at such wide-ranging domains of achievement as the National Spelling Bee and the West Point military academy. Tough describes the surprising power of this seemingly mundane questionnaire:

For each statement, respondents score themselves on a five-point scale, ranging from 5, "very much like me," to 1, "not like me at all." The test takes about three minutes to complete, and it relies entirely on self-report — and yet when Duckworth and Peterson took it out into the field, they found it was remarkably predictive of success. Grit, Duckworth discovered , is only faintly related to IQ — there are smart gritty people and dumb gritty people — but at Penn, high grit scores allowed students who had entered college with relatively low college-board scores to nonetheless achieve high GPAs. At the National Spelling Bee, Duckworth found that children with high grit scores were more likely to survive to the later rounds. Most remarkable, Duckworth and Peterson gave their grit test to more than twelve hundred freshman cadets as they entered the military academy at West Point and embarked on the grueling summer training course known as Beast Barracks. The military has developed its own complex evaluation, called the whole candidate score, to judge incoming cadets and predict which of them will survive the demands of West Point; it includes academic grades, a gauge of physical fitness, and a leadership potential score. But the more accurate predictor of which cadets persisted in Beast Barracks and which ones dropped out turned out to be Duckworth's simple little twelve-item grit questionnaire.

You can take the Grit Scale here (registration is free). For more on the impact of Duckworth's work, do treat yourself to the altogether indispensable How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character.

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Fwd: Web of Knowledge Alert - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

*******************************************
Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist
Director, IAP
www.themindhub.com
*******************************************

Web of Knowledge Table of Contents Alert
>
> Journal Name: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (ISSN: 0144-3410)
> Issue: Vol. 33 No. 5, 2013
> IDS#: 212RA
> Alert Expires: 10 JAN 2014
> Number of Articles in Issue: 7 (7 included in this e-mail)
> Organization ID: c4f3d919329a46768459d3e35b8102e6
> ========================================================================
> Note: Instructions on how to purchase the full text of an article and Thomson Reuters Science Contact information are at the end of the e-mail.
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 521-539 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323999300001
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Conceptions of creativity among Hong Kong university students
>
> Authors:
> Zhang, LF
>
> Source:
> *EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY*, 33 (5):521-539; SI AUG 1 2013
>
> Abstract:
> This research had two objectives. The first was to determine the
> reliability and validity of the multifaceted assessment of creativity
> (MAC) for evaluating Hong Kong university students' conceptions of
> creativity. The second was to establish if the theory-practice and
> gender gaps discovered among mainland Chinese university students would
> be replicated. The theoretical foundation for the MAC is the investment
> theory of creativity. Participants were 156 university students in Hong
> Kong. Results showed that Hong Kong university students' conceptions of
> creativity fit well with the six resources for creativity measured by
> the MAC: intelligence, knowledge, intellectual style, personality,
> motivation and environment. The present data not only confirmed the
> theory-practice and gender discrepancies previously found among mainland
> Chinese university students, but also revealed an additional gap - a
> theory-practice gap found only in participants' evaluation of female
> school students. Implications are discussed for research and for the
> psychology of teaching and learning.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 540-560 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323999300002
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The effects of classroom goal structures on the creativity of junior high school students
>
> Authors:
> Peng, SL; Cherng, BL; Chen, HC
>
> Source:
> *EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY*, 33 (5):540-560; SI AUG 1 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Previous studies have indicated that situational factors can influence
> students' creativity. However, no studies have specifically examined the
> relationship between classroom goal structures and student creativity
> during real classroom activities. For this study, we recruited 232
> seventh-grade students from Taipei City and randomly divided them into
> the following three classroom goal structure groups at the start of the
> semester: an enhanced group with a mastery classroom goal structure, an
> enhanced group with a multiple (mastery and performance) classroom goal
> structure and a control group. Before receiving the experimental
> manipulation, the students' level of creativity showed no significant
> differences. After six weeks, the students in the enhanced groups with
> mastery classroom goal structure and multiple classroom goal structure
> exhibited superior fluency, flexibility and creativity compared to those
> in the control group. However, the creativity of the students in the
> enhanced groups with mastery classroom goal structure and multiple
> classroom goal structure showed no significant difference. This
> indicates that the mastery classroom goal structure itself can
> sufficiently enhance students' creativity. The results of this study
> support the existence of a causal relationship between classroom goal
> structures and student creativity. When teachers develop an appropriate
> learning climate in classrooms with an emphasis on mastery goals,
> students' creativity and creative expression can be stimulated. We also
> discuss the theoretical and extendable implications of this study based
> on the results.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 561-581 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323999300003
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Imagination and creativity: wellsprings and streams of education - the Taiwan experience
>
> Authors:
> Wu, JJ; Albanese, DL
>
> Source:
> *EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY*, 33 (5):561-581; SI AUG 1 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Creativity and imagination in education are increasingly emphasised
> around the world. However, a lack of these qualities in Chinese
> societies has been discussed in the academia and popular media, and
> attributed to various factors, standardised testing chief among them. In
> Taiwan, a team of scholars working with the Ministry of Education has,
> since the turn of the century, made special efforts to do research and
> promote creativity and imagination in education. This paper traces the
> development of policies and action plans and the implementation of
> creativity education and imagination in education programmes in Taiwan.
> Both programmes start from elementary school and go through higher
> education, and also include lifelong learners and administrators; they
> are, thus, inclusive of all levels within Taiwan's educational system.
> This paper cites examples of the action plans and their effects.
> Finally, implications for educational policy and teaching and learning
> are drawn from the Taiwan experience.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 582-595 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323999300004
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Uniqueness, integration or separation? exploring the nature of creativity through creative writing by elementary school students in Taiwan
>
> Authors:
> Chu, TL; Lin, WW
>
> Source:
> *EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY*, 33 (5):582-595; SI AUG 1 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The primary goal of our study was to investigate the importance of
> originality in divergent thinking (DT) tests and to determine whether
> originality is the best reflection of creativity. To accomplish this, we
> cross-validated the DT test and creative writing task rating by
> consensual assessment technique (CAT). Thirty-seven elementary school
> pupils (18 males, 19 females) were asked to complete the imagination
> test (a type of DT test) and a creative writing task (If I were a
> principal') with CAT rating. The composite creativity score, sub-scores
> and originality-ratio score derived from the DT and CAT-creativity
> scores were obtained. The data were analysed using Pearson
> product-moment correlations and the difference analysis of these
> correlation coefficients. The results revealed a significantly higher
> correlation between DT-originality and CAT-creativity than between
> DT-composite creativity and CAT-creativity, and the originality-ratio
> score was more highly correlated with CAT than with the other scores. We
> confirmed the importance of originality in DT tests, and we here propose
> primary (originality) and supportive (fluency and flexibility) abilities
> as alternative ways to explain creative potential.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 596-615 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323999300005
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Designing a "creativity and assessment scale' for arts education
>
> Authors:
> Leong, S; Qiu, XL
>
> Source:
> *EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY*, 33 (5):596-615; SI AUG 1 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Having accurate insights of teachers' conceptions of creativity and the
> role of assessment in arts education would inform education policy,
> training programmes and the measurement of learning outcomes. Yet no
> study has been found to examine the relationship between teachers'
> conceptions of creativity and their conceptions of assessment in arts
> education. Additionally, there is no suitable instrument found that has
> been designed for measuring the interactions between teachers'
> conceptions of creativity and their conceptions of assessment practice
> in arts education. The study has successfully developed and validated an
> instrument for use in arts education with satisfactory psychometric
> properties and sensitivity to respondents' gender and major area of
> study. It has enabled the study to obtain useful findings that
> illustrate the importance of studying the conceptions of creativity and
> assessment practices, and discussed key issues raised in four areas:
> conceptions held vs. practice realities; giftedness and talent in the
> arts; skills development and the creative environment; and creativity
> and assessment. These could provide important insights for pedagogy
> development, teacher evaluation, as well as decision and policy-making
> in educational reform, teacher education, professional development and
> research.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 616-627 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323999300006
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Psychological adjustment of creative children: perspectives from self, peer and teacher
>
> Authors:
> Li, WL; Poon, JCY; Tong, TMY; Lau, S
>
> Source:
> *EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY*, 33 (5):616-627; SI AUG 1 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Previous research in the literature on the relationships between
> creativity and psychological adjustment tended to use only one or two
> sources of creativity assessment and focus on a few aspects of
> adjustment. To examine creative children's psychological adjustment more
> thoroughly, this exploratory study assessed children's creativity from
> multiple sources (objective assessment, teachers and peers) and
> incorporated multiple aspects of adjustment (self-concept, popularity
> and sociability). The sample consisted of 53 primary school children.
> Findings revealed that 10% of the children were selected by both
> teachers and peers as creative, among whom half of these children were
> identified as creative based on their creativity scores. Those
> identified as creative based on the Wallach-Kogan creativity tests
> scores were more popular and perceived to possess sociability-leadership
> traits. Children perceived by teachers as creative saw themselves as
> better in academic, social and general self-concept. Finally, those
> perceived by peers as creative rated themselves as better in appearance
> self-concept. These findings provide a foundation for further research,
> and their implications are discussed.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 628-643 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323999300007
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Chinese students' perceptions of their creativity and their perceptions of Western students' creativity
>
> Authors:
> Wang, BX; Greenwood, KM
>
> Source:
> *EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY*, 33 (5):628-643; SI AUG 1 2013
>
> Abstract:
> This paper applies the Four C Model of Creativity (Big-C, little-c,
> mini-c and Pro-c') to determine Chinese students' perceptions of their
> own creativity and their perceptions of Western students' creativity. By
> surveying 100 Chinese students and interviewing 10 of them, this paper
> discovered that Chinese students generally perceived their creativity to
> be less than that of Western students. Differences on mini-c and Pro-c
> were larger in the direction of Western students being superior, and the
> items that differed in the opposite direction and those which did not
> differ were part of the subset of little-c items. The perceived
> superiority of Western students was not as strong in final-year
> students. Suggestions are proposed on how to nurture students'
> creativity within context of culture.
>
>

FwdJournal Alert - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

>
> Web of Knowledge Table of Contents Alert
>
> Journal Name: PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (ISSN: 1040-3590)
> Issue: Vol. 25 No. 3, 2013
> IDS#: 212PH
> Alert Expires: 10 JAN 2014
> Number of Articles in Issue: 35 (35 included in this e-mail)
> Organization ID: c4f3d919329a46768459d3e35b8102e6
> ========================================================================
> Note: Instructions on how to purchase the full text of an article and Thomson Reuters Science Contact information are at the end of the e-mail.
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 671-678 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800001
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans: The Utility of the MMPI-2-RF Validity Scales in Detecting Overreported Symptoms
>
> Authors:
> Goodwin, BE; Sellbom, M; Arbisi, PA
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):671-678; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The current investigation examined the utility of the overreporting
> validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality
> Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008)
> in detecting noncredible reporting of symptoms of posttraumatic stress
> disorder (PTSD) in a sample of disability-seeking veterans. We also
> examined the effect of mental health knowledge on the utility of these
> scales by investigating the extent to which these scales differentiate
> between veterans with PTSD and individuals with mental health training
> who were asked to feign symptoms of PTSD on the test. Group differences
> on validity scale scores indicated that these scales were associated
> with large effect sizes for differentiating veterans who overreported
> from those with PTSD and for differentiating between mental health
> professionals and veterans with PTSD. Implications of these results in
> terms of clinical practice are discussed.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 679-691 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800002
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Basic Empathy Scale in Adults (BES-A): Factor Structure of a Revised Form
>
> Authors:
> Carre, A; Stefaniak, N; D'Ambrosio, F; Bensalah, L; Besche-Richard, C
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):679-691; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Initially thought of as a unitary ability, empathy has been more
> recently considered to consist of 2 components (i.e., an affective and a
> cognitive component). The Basic Empathy Scale (BES) is a tool that has
> been used to assess empathy in young people and adolescents on the basis
> of this dual-component conception (Jolliffe & Farrington, 2006). Recent
> studies of empathy have led to it being defined as underpinned by 3
> components, namely, emotional contagion, emotional disconnection, and
> cognitive empathy. The aims of this study were (a) to validate the BES
> in Adults and (b) to compare the different conceptions of empathy. Three
> hundred seventy French adults took part in the study, and 160 of them
> filled out complementary scales measuring empathy, alexithymia, and
> emotional consciousness. The confirmatory factor analyses showed that
> the 3-factor model was the model that was best able to account for the
> data. Complementary tools confirmed the relationships previously
> observed between empathy as assessed with the BES and other scales
> assessing emotional processes. The results of this study make it clear
> that empathy can be seen as process-dependent. This conception of
> empathy, which is based on 3 factors, is consistent with the current,
> more integrated view of empathy. The implications of this conception and
> the opportunity to use the 2 or 3 factors of the BES in adults are
> presented in the Discussion.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 692-705 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800003
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> An Independent Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) Integrated: What Do the Process Approach Subtests Measure?
>
> Authors:
> Benson, N; Hulac, DM; Bernstein, JD
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):692-705; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Fourth Edition (WISC-IV)
> Integrated contains the WISC-IV core and supplemental subtests along
> with process approach subtests designed to facilitate a process-oriented
> approach to score interpretation. The purpose of this study was to
> examine the extent to which WISC-IV Integrated subtests measure the
> constructs they are purported to measure. In addition to examining the
> measurement and scoring model provided in the manual, this study also
> tested hypotheses regarding Cattell-Horn-Carroll abilities that might be
> measured along with other substantive questions regarding the factor
> structure of the WISC-IV Integrated and the nature of abilities measured
> by process approach subtests. Results provide insight regarding the
> constructs measured by these subtests. Many subtests appear to be good
> to excellent measures of psychometric g (i.e., the general factor
> presumed to cause the positive correlation of mental tasks). Other
> abilities measured by subtests are described. For some subtests, the
> majority of variance is not accounted for by theoretical constructs
> included in the scoring model. Modifications made to remove demands such
> as memory recall and verbal expression were found to reduce
> construct-irrelevant variance. The WISC-IV Integrated subtests appear to
> measure similar constructs across ages 6-16, although strict factorial
> invariance was not supported.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 706-713 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800004
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> A Prescriptive Intergenerational-Tension Ageism Scale: Succession, Identity, and Consumption (SIC)
>
> Authors:
> North, MS; Fiske, ST
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):706-713; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> We introduce a novel ageism scale, focusing on prescriptive beliefs
> concerning potential intergenerational tensions: active, envied resource
> succession, symbolic identity avoidance, and passive, shared-resource
> consumption (SIC). Four studies (2,010 total participants) were Used to
> develop the scale. Exploratory factor analysis formed an initial
> 20-item, 3-factor solution (Study 1). The scale converges appropriately
> with other prejudice measures and diverges from other social control
> measures (Study 2). It diverges from antiyouth ageism (Study 3). The
> Study 4 experiment yielded both predictive and divergent validity
> apropos another ageism measure. Structural equation modeling confirmed
> model fit across all studies. Per an intergenerational-tension focus,
> younger people consistently scored the highest. As generational equity
> issues intensify, the scale provides a contemporary tool for current and
> future ageism research.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 714-721 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800005
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Assessment of Self-Harm Risk Using Implicit Thoughts
>
> Authors:
> Randall, JR; Rowe, BH; Dong, KA; Nock, MK; Colman, I
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):714-721; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Assessing for the risk of self-harm in acute care is a difficult task,
> and more information on pertinent risk factors is needed to inform
> clinical practice. This study examined the relationship of 6 forms of
> implicit cognition about death, suicide, and self-harm with the
> occurrence of self-harm in the future. We then attempted to develop a
> model using these measures of implicit cognition along with other
> psychometric tests and clinical risk factors. We conducted a prospective
> cohort of 107 patients (age > 17 years) with a baseline assessment that
> included 6 implicit association tests that assessed thoughts of death,
> suicide, and self-harm. Psychometric questionnaires were also completed
> by the patients, and these included the Beck Hopelessness Scale (Beck,
> Weissman, Lester, & Trexler, 1974), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (Patton,
> Stanford, & Barratt, 1995), Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis &
> Melisaratos, 1983), CAGE questionnaire for alcoholism (Ewing, 1984), and
> the Drug Abuse Screening Test 10 (Skinner, 1982). Medical and
> demographic information was also obtained for patients as potential
> confounders or useful covariables. The outcome measure was the
> occurrence of self-harm within 3 months. Implicit associations with
> death versus life as a predictor added significantly (odds ratio = 5.1,
> 95% confidence interval [1.3, 20.3]) to a multivariable model. The model
> had 96.6% sensitivity and 53.9% specificity with a high cutoff, or 58.6%
> sensitivity and 96.2% specificity with a low cutoff. This scale shows
> promise for screening emergency department patients with mental health
> presentations who may be at risk for future self-harm or suicide.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 722-729 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800006
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children (IUSC): Discriminating Principal Anxiety Diagnoses and Severity
>
> Authors:
> Read, KL; Comer, JS; Kendall, PC
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):722-729; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The specific relationship of intolerance of uncertainty (IU) to
> generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in youth was examined by evaluating
> the ability of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children (IUSC)
> to discriminate among principal anxiety disorder diagnoses. Analyses
> examined parent, child, and composite reports of principal anxiety
> diagnoses in youth aged 7 to 17 years. Results indicate that higher ID
> scores are associated with GAD by the composite diagnostic.
> Additionally, the IUSC significantly predicted child-reported anxiety
> severity. This relationship was not moderated by diagnostic group. The
> results indicate that IUSC scores are particularly associated with GAD,
> as well as with more severe child-reported anxiety symptoms.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 730-737 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800007
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Decision Curve Analysis for Assessing the Usefulness of Tests for Making Decisions to Treat: An Application to Tests for Prodromal Psychosis
>
> Authors:
> Pulleyblank, R; Chuma, J; Gilbody, SM; Thompson, C
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):730-737; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> For a test to be considered useful for making treatment decisions, it is
> necessary that making treatment decisions based on the results of the
> test be a preferable strategy to making treatment decisions without the
> test. Decision curve analysis is a framework for assessing when a test
> would be expected to be useful, which integrates evidence of a test's
> performance characteristics (sensitivity and specificity), condition
> prevalence among at-risk patients, and patient preferences for
> treatment. We describe decision curve analysis generally and illustrate
> its potential through an application to tests for prodromal psychosis.
> Clinical psychosis is often preceded by a prodromal phase, but not all
> those with prodromal symptoms proceed to develop full psychosis.
> Patients identified as at risk for developing psychosis may be
> considered for proactive treatment to mitigate development of clinically
> defined psychosis. Tests exist to help identify those at-risk patients
> most likely to develop psychosis, but it is uncertain when these tests
> would be considered useful for making proactive treatment decisions. We
> apply decision curve analysis to results from a systematic review of
> studies investigating clinical tests for predicting the development of
> psychosis in at-risk populations, and present resulting decision curves
> that illustrate when the tests may be expected to be useful for making
> proactive treatment decisions.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 738-747 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800008
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Development and Validation of the Alcohol Myopia Scale
>
> Authors:
> Lac, A; Berger, DE
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):738-747; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Alcohol myopia-theory-conceptualizes-the ability of alcohol to-narrow
> attention-and-how this-demand-on mental resources produces the
> impairments of self-inflation, relief, and excess. The current research
> was designed to develop and validate a scale based on this framework.
> People who were alcohol users rated items representing myopic
> experiences arising from drinking episodes in the past month. In Study 1
> (N = 260), the preliminary 3-factor structure was supported by
> exploratory factor analysis. In Study 2 (N = 289), the 3-factor
> structure was substantiated with confirmatory factor analysis, and it
> was superior in fit to an empirically indefensible 1-factor structure.
> The final 14-item scale was evaluated with internal consistency
> reliability, discriminant validity, convergent validity, criterion
> validity, and incremental validity. The Alcohol Myopia Scale (AMS)
> illuminates conceptual underpinnings of this theory and yields insights
> for understanding the tunnel vision that arises from intoxication.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 748-758 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800009
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory (FFNI): A Test of the Convergent, Discriminant, and Incremental Validity of FFNI Scores in Clinical and Community Samples
>
> Authors:
> Miller, JD; Few, LR; Wilson, L; Gentile, B; Widiger, TA; MacKillop, J;
> Campbell, WK
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):748-758; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory (FFNI) is a new self-report measure
> that was developed to assess traits associated with narcissistic
> personality disorder (NPD), as well as grandiose and vulnerable
> narcissism from a five-factor model (FFM) perspective. In the current
> study, the FFNI was examined in relation to Diagnostic and Statistical
> Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV; American
> Psychiatric Association, 2000) NPD, DSM-5 (http://www.dsm5.org) NPD
> traits, grandiose narcissism, and vulnerable narcissism in both
> community (N = 287) and clinical samples (N = 98). Across the samples,
> the FFNI scales manifested good convergent and discriminant validity
> such that FFNI scales derived from FFM neuroticism were primarily
> related to vulnerable narcissism scores, scales derived from FFM
> extraversion were primarily related to grandiose scores, and FFNI scales
> derived from FFM agreeableness were related to both narcissism
> dimensions, as well as the DSM IV and DSM-5 NPD scores. The FFNI
> grandiose and vulnerable narcissism composites also demonstrated
> incremental validity in the statistical prediction of these scores,
> above and beyond existing measures of DSM NPD, grandiose narcissism, and
> vulnerable narcissism, respectively. The FFNI is a promising measure
> that provides a comprehensive assessment of narcissistic pathology while
> maintaining ties to the significant general personality literature on
> the FFM.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 759-768 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800010
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Psychometric Properties of the Readiness and Motivation Questionnaire: A Symptom-Specific Measure of Readiness for Change in the Eating Disorders
>
> Authors:
> Geller, J; Brown, KE; Srikameswaran, S; Piper, W; Dunn, EC
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):759-768; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Readiness for change, as assessed by the Readiness and Motivation
> Interview (RMI), predicts a number of clinical outcome variables in
> eating disorders, including enrollment in intensive treatment, symptom
> change, dropout, and relapse. Although clinically useful, the training
> and administration of the RMI is time consuming. The purpose of this
> research was to (a) develop a self-report, symptom-specific version of
> the RMI, the Readiness and Motivation Questionnaire (RMQ), that can be
> used to assess readiness for change across all eating disorder diagnoses
> and (b) establish its psychometric properties. The RMQ provides stage of
> change, internality, and confidence scores for each of 4 eating disorder
> symptom domains (restriction, bingeing, and cognitive and compensatory
> behaviors). Individuals (N = 244) with current eating disorder diagnoses
> completed the RMQ and measures of convergent, discriminant, and
> criterion validity. Similar to the RMI scores, readiness scores on the
> RMQ differed according to symptom domain. Regarding criterion validity,
> RMQ scores were significantly associated with ratings of anticipated
> difficulty of recovery activities and completion of recovery activities.
> The RMQ contributed significant unique variance to anticipated
> difficulty of recovery activities, beyond those accounted for by the RMI
> and a questionnaire measure of global readiness. The RMQ is thus an
> acceptable alternative to the RML, providing global and domain-specific
> readiness information when time or cost prohibits use of an interview.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 769-779 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800011
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Comparing Countdown- and IRT-Based Approaches to Computerized Adaptive Personality Testing
>
> Authors:
> Rudick, MM; Yam, WH; Simms, LJ
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):769-779; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is an emerging technology in the
> personality assessment literature given the greater efficiency it
> affords compared with traditional methods. However, few studies have
> directly compared the efficiency and validity of 2 competing methods for
> personality CAT: (a) methods based on item response theory (IRT-CAT)
> versus (b) methods based on the countdown method (CM-CAT). To that end,
> we conducted real-data simulations with previously collected responses
> (N = 8,690) to the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality
> (SNAP). Three CAT algorithms (IRT-CAT, IRT-CAT with 5-item minimum,
> CM-CAT) were evaluated for item savings, classification accuracy, and
> convergent/discriminant validity. All CATs yielded lower classification
> accuracy and validity than traditional testing but required 18%-86%
> fewer items. Ultimately, the lRT-CAT, with minimum 5-item requirement,
> struck the most ideal balance of highest item savings, and generally
> fewer costs to validity and accuracy. These results confirm findings
> regarding item savings trends from previous CAT studies. In addition,
> this study provides a model for how the validity and precision of CATs
> may be compared across personality assessments.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 780-795 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800012
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Subjective Response to Alcohol
>
> Authors:
> Morean, ME; Corbin, WR; Treat, TA
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):780-795; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Three decades of research demonstrate that individual differences in
> subjective response (SR) to acute alcohol effects predict heavy drinking
> and alcohol-related problems. However, the SR patterns conferring the
> greatest risk remain under debate. Morean and Corbin (2010) highlighted
> that extant SR measures commonly have limitations within the following
> areas: assessment of a comprehensive range of effects, assessment of
> effects over the complete course of a drinking episode, and/or
> psychometric validation. Furthermore, the consistent pairing of certain
> SR measures and theoretical models has made integration of findings
> difficult. To address these issues, we developed the Subjective Effects
> of Alcohol Scale (SEAS), a novel, psychometrically sound SR measure for
> use in alcohol administration studies. Pilot data ensured that the SEAS
> comprised a comprehensive range of effects that varied in terms of
> valence and arousal and were perceived as plausible effects of drinking.
> For validation purposes, the SEAS was included in a 2-site,
> placebo-controlled, alcohol administration study (N = 215). Exploratory
> and confirmatory factor analyses identified a 14-item, 4-factor model
> categorizing effects into affective quadrants (high/low arousal
> positive; high/low arousal negative). SEAS scores evidenced the
> following: (a) scalar measurement invariance by limb of the blood
> alcohol curve (BAC) and beverage condition; (b) good internal
> consistency; (c) convergence/divergence with extant SR measures, alcohol
> expectancies, and alcohol use; and (d) concurrent/incremental utility in
> accounting for alcohol-related outcomes, highlighting the novel high
> arousal negative and low arousal positive subscales.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 796-809 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800013
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Passion: Does One Scale Fit All? Construct Validity of Two-Factor Passion Scale and Psychometric Invariance Over Different Activities and Languages
>
> Authors:
> Marsh, HW; Vallerand, RJ; Lafreniere, MAK; Parker, P; Morin, AJS;
> Carbonneau, N; Jowett, S; Bureau, JS; Fernet, C; Guay, F; Abduljabbar,
> AS; Paquet, Y
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):796-809; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Passion Scale, based on the dualistic model of passion, measures 2
> distinct types of passion: Harmonious and obsessive passions are
> predictive of adaptive and less adaptive outcomes, respectively. In a
> substantive-methodological synergy, we evaluate the construct validity
> (factor structure, reliability, convergent and discriminant validity) of
> Passion Scale responses (N = 3,571). The exploratory structural equation
> model fit to the data was substantially better than the confirmatory
> factor analysis solution, and resulted in better differentiated (less
> correlated) factors. Results from a 13-model taxonomy of measurement
> invariance supported complete invariance (factor loadings, factor
> correlations, item uniquenesses, item intercepts, and latent means) over
> language (French vs. English; the instrument was originally devised in
> French, then translated into English) and gender. Strong measurement
> partial invariance over 5 passion activity groups (leisure, sport,
> social, work, education) indicates that the same set of items is
> appropriate for assessing passion across a wide variety of activities a
> previously untested, implicit assumption that greatly enhances practical
> utility. Support was found for the convergent and discriminant validity
> of the harmonious and obsessive passion scales, based on a set of
> validity correlates: life satisfaction, rumination, conflict, time
> investment, activity liking and valuation, and perceiving the activity
> as a passion.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 810-825 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800014
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Multilevel Confirmatory Ordinal Factor Analysis of the Life Skills Profile-16
>
> Authors:
> Little, J
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):810-825; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The aim of this study was to assess the factor structure of the Life
> Skills Profile-16 (LSP-16; Buckingham, Burgess, Solomon, Pirkis, &
> Eagar, 1998a, 1998b) with a view-to-meeting-the assumption of
> statistical independence that is at significant risk of violation due to
> the dependency introduced to the data by pooling numerous ratings made
> by the same observers across independent patients. The sample consisted
> of 20,181 outpatients rated by 2,071 clinicians employed within 54
> mental health organizations within the New South Wales public adult
> mental health service. To estimate the extent to which the item scores
> were contaminated with rater-level intraclass correlations (ICC), I fit
> 16 3-level multinominal ordered proportional odds intercept only models
> that revealed large ICCs associated with Level 2 (the rater of the
> LSP-16) demonstrating that a multilevel analysis was required. A
> multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (M-CFA) using robust weighted
> least squares (B. O. Muthen, du Toit, & Spisic, 1997) with polychoric
> correlation was used to test the fit of 2 measurement models that were
> hypothesized a priori. The 2 models failed to provide an acceptable fit
> to the sample data and within- and between-level CFAs were used to
> inform revisions to the 4-factor model. A 15-item version of the LSP was
> developed, which provided an improved approximate fit in an M-CFA.
> Limitations of these findings are discussed.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 826-843 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800015
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> A Brief Form of the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales
>
> Authors:
> Barrett, FS; Robins, RW; Janata, P
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):826-843; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS) were developed to
> measure behavioral traits related to 6 affective neurobiological systems
> (play, seek, care, fear, anger, and sadness). However, the ANPS has a
> number of problems, including an ill-defined factor structure, overly
> long scales, and items that are poorly worded, ambiguous, and of
> questionable content validity. To address these issues, we constructed
> an improved short form of the ANPS the Brief ANPS (BANPS). Three studies
> demonstrated that the 33-item BANPS has a clear and coherent factor
> structure, relatively high reliabilities (for short scales), and
> theoretically meaningful correlations with a wide range of external
> criteria, supporting its convergent and discriminant validity. Unlike
> typical short-form scales, the BANPS improves upon the psychometric
> properties of the long form, and we recommend its use in all research
> contexts.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 844-858 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800016
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Experimental Manipulation of Working Memory Model Parameters: An Exercise in Construct Validity
>
> Authors:
> Brown, GG; Turner, TH; Mano, QR; Bolden, K; Thomas, ML
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):844-858; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> As parametric cognitive models become more commonly used to measure
> individual differences, the construct validity of the interpretation of
> individual model parameters needs to be well established. The validity
> of the interpretation of 2 parameters of a formal model of the
> Continuous Recognition Memory Test (CRMT) was investigated in 2
> experiments. The 1st study found that manipulating the percentage of
> trials on the CRMT for which degraded pseudowords were presented altered
> the model's stimulus encoding parameter but not the working memory
> displacement parameter. The 2nd experiment showed that manipulating the
> number of syllables forming a pseudoword altered the model's working
> memory displacement parameter for each syllable added to the pseudoword.
> Findings from both experiments supported the construct representation of
> the model parameters, supporting the construct validity of the model's
> use to interpret CRMT performance. Combining parametric models with the
> manipulation of factors that theory predicts are related to model
> parameters provides an approach to construct validation that bridges
> experimental and individual difference methods of studying human
> cognition.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 859-878 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800017
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Development and Validation of the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory (EPSI)
>
> Authors:
> Forbush, KT; Wildes, JE; Pollack, LO; Dunbar, D; Luo, J; Patterson, K;
> Petruzzi, L; Pollpeter, M; Miller, H; Stone, A; Bright, A; Watson, D
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):859-878; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Many current measures of eating disorder (ED) symptoms have 1 or more
> serious limitations, such as inconsistent factor structures or poor
> discriminant validity. The goal of this study was to overcome these
> limitations through the development of a comprehensive multidimensional
> measure of eating pathology. An initial pool of 160 items was developed
> to assess 20 dimensions of eating pathology. The initial item pool was
> administered to a student sample (N = 433) and community sample (N =
> 407) to determine the preliminary structure of the measure using
> exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. The revised measure was
> administered to independent samples of patients recruited from specialty
> ED treatment centers (N = 158), outpatient psychiatric clinics (N =
> 303), and students (N = 227). Analyses revealed an 8-factor structure
> characterized by Body Dissatisfaction, Binge Eating, Cognitive
> Restraint, Excessive Exercise, Restricting, Purging, Muscle Building,
> and Negative Attitudes Toward Obesity. Scale scores showed excellent
> convergent and discriminant validity; other analyses demonstrated that
> the majority of scales were invariant across sex and weight categories.
> Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory scale scores had excellent internal
> consistency (median coefficient alphas ranged from .84-.89) and
> reliability over a 2- to 4-week period (mean retest r = .73). The
> current study represents one of the most comprehensive scale development
> projects ever conducted in the field of EDs and will enhance future
> basic and treatment research focused on EDs.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 879-892 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800018
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Comparing Two Forms of a Childhood Perspective-Taking Measure Using CFA and IRT
>
> Authors:
> Carey, JM; Cassels, TG
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):879-892; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Deficits in perspective-taking ability have been linked to social
> problems associated with disorders such as autism spectrum disorders
> (ASD) and conduct disorder. Even subtle deficits in perspective-taking
> are related to social adjustment and moral development. A common measure
> of perspective-taking abilities in children is the "Reading the Mind in
> the Eyes Task" ("Eyes task"; Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Spong, Scahill, &
> Lawson, 2001). The Eyes task was primarily developed for use in
> identifying individuals with ASDs, while its function with nonclinical
> populations has not been clearly addressed. Additionally, it is unknown
> whether the Eyes task can be used to measure specific deficits or
> abilities in the cognitive or emotional components of
> perspective-taldng. In this article we assessed the structure and
> function of the Eyes task and an open ended or generative format of the
> same task (Generative Eyes Task; GET) found to measure emotional
> perspective-taking specifically. Confirmatory factor analyses found the
> traditional Eyes task to have the assumed single factor structure, while
> the GET has a clear 2-factor structure corresponding to emotionally
> valenced or neutral items. The Eyes task and the GET were also compared
> using item response theory. The Eyes task provided the most measurement
> accuracy at 2 standard deviations below the mean making it most accurate
> for populations with severe deficits, while the GET was most accurate at
> the mean level of perspective-taking. Based on these analyses, we
> conclude that the GET is more appropriate for use in nonclinical
> populations and when emotional perspective-taking abilities are of
> interest.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 893-904 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800019
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Development and Validation of the Revised Identity Style Inventory (ISI-5): Factor Structure, Reliability, and Validity
>
> Authors:
> Berzonsky, MD; Soenens, B; Luyckx, K; Smits, I; Papini, DR; Goossens, L
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):893-904; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Identity processing style refers to differences in how individuals
> process identity-relevant information as they engage or manage to avoid
> the challenges of constructing, maintaining, and/or reconstructing a
> sense of identity. The third version of the Identity Style Inventory
> (Berzonsky, 1992b) has been used to operationally define identity styles
> in most empirical investigations. The objective of the present series of
> studies was the development and validation of a new revised measure of
> identity processing style: Identity Style Inventory Version 5 (ISI-5).
> Initially a pool of 39 generic items was generated that highlighted the
> processing of identity-relevant information on content-neutral issues
> such as personal values, goals, problems, and the like. Three style
> scales were identified by Exploratory Factor Analysis: A 9-item
> Informational-style scale; a 9-item Normative-style scale; and a 9-item
> Diffuse-avoidant style scale. Confirmatory factor analysis on an
> independent sample indicated that this 3-factor solution provided the
> best fit. Results from 5 studies provided evidence for the psychometric
> properties of the scales. Scores on the 3 style scales demonstrated good
> test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Theoretically
> predicted correlations between the ISI-5 scale scores and performance on
> measures of identity status, content, and commitment, and measures of
> rational and automatic processing provided evidence for their convergent
> and discriminant validity. It is concluded that the scales should be
> useful for researchers interested in investigating individual
> differences in identity processing style. Limitations and directions for
> future research are considered.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 905-916 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800020
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Predictive Validity of Adult Risk Assessment Tools With Juveniles Who Offended Sexually
>
> Authors:
> Ralston, CA; Epperson, DL
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):905-916; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> An often-held assumption in the area of sexual recidivism risk
> assessment is that different tools should be used for adults and
> juveniles. This assumption is driven either by the observation that
> adolescents tend to be in a constant state of flux in the areas of
> development, education, and social structure or by the fact that the
> judicial system recognizes that juveniles and adults are different.
> Though the assumption is plausible, it is largely untested. The present
> study addressed this issue by scoring 2 adult sexual offender risk
> assessment tools, the Minnesota Sex Offender Screening Tool Revised and
> the Static-99, on an exhaustive sample (N = 636) of juveniles who had
> sexually offended (JSOs) in Utah. For comparison, 2 tools designed for
> JSOs were also scored: the Juvenile Sex Offender Assessment Protocol-II
> and the Juvenile Risk Assessment Scale. Recidivism data were collected
> for 2 time periods: before age 18 (sexual, violent, any recidivism) and
> from age 18 to the year 2004 (sexual). The adult actuarial risk
> assessment tools predicted all types of juvenile recidivism
> significantly and at approximately the same level of accuracy as
> juvenile-specific tools. However, the accuracy of longer term
> predictions of adult sexual recidivism across all 4 tools was
> substantially lower than the accuracy achieved in predicting juvenile
> sexual recidivism, with 2 of the tools producing nonsignificant results,
> documenting the greater difficulty in making longer term predictions on
> the basis of adolescent behavior.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 917-928 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800021
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Secondary Trauma Self-Efficacy: Concept and Its Measurement
>
> Authors:
> Cieslak, R; Shoji, K; Luszczynska, A; Taylor, S; Rogala, A; Benight, CC
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):917-928; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Secondary Trauma Self-Efficacy (STSE) Scale was developed and
> psychometrically evaluated in 2 studies targeting populations indirectly
> exposed to traumatic events through work with traumatized clients. Study
> 1 enrolled behavioral health professionals (n = 247) providing trauma
> therapy for military clients in the United States. Study 2 investigated
> characteristics of the STSE Scale among health care and social workers
> (n(T1) = 306, n(T2) = 193) providing services for trauma victims and
> survivors in Poland. Rooted in social cognitive theory, the 7-item STSE
> Scale is used to evaluate perceived ability to cope with the challenging
> demands resulting from work with traumatized clients and perceived
> ability to deal with the secondary traumatic stress symptoms. In both
> studies, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis showed
> unidimensionality of the scale. The results indicated good internal
> consistency of the STSE Scale and its stability over time. STSE
> correlated highly or moderately with secondary traumatic stress
> symptoms. Comparatively, associations between STSE and perceived social
> support, secondary traumatic growth, and negative beliefs about the
> world and self were either moderate or low. The STSE factor structure
> and pattern of correlations with the validity measures were invariant
> across the 2 studies, which indicated that the STSE Scale may be a
> culturally unbiased instrument.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 929-941 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800022
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Value of Suppressor Effects in Explicating the Construct Validity of Symptom Measures
>
> Authors:
> Watson, D; Clark, LA; Chmielewski, M; Kotov, R
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):929-941; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Suppressor effects are operating when the addition of a predictor
> increases the predictive power of another variable. We argue that
> suppressor effects can play a valuable role in explicating the construct
> validity of symptom measures by bringing into clearer focus opposing
> elements that are inherent but largely hidden in the measure's overall
> score. We illustrate this point using theoretically grounded, replicated
> suppressor effects that have emerged in analyses of the original
> Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS; Watson et al., 2007)
> and its expanded 2nd version (IDAS-II; Watson et al., 2012). In Study 1,
> we demonstrate that the IDAS-II Appetite Gain and Appetite Loss scales
> contain both (a) a shared distress component that creates a positive
> correlation between them and (b) a specific symptom component that
> produces a natural negative association between them (i.e., people who
> recently have experienced decreased interest in food/loss of appetite
> are less likely to report a concomitant increase in appetite/weight). In
> Study 2, we establish that mania scales also contain 2 distinct elements
> namely, high energy/positive emotionality and general
> distress/dysfunction-that oppose each another in many instances. In both
> studies, we obtained evidence of suppression effects that were highly
> robust across different types of respondents (e.g., clinical
> outpatients, community adults, college students) and using both
> self-report and interview-based measures. These replicable suppressor
> effects establish that many homogeneous, unidimensional symptom scales
> actually contain distinguishable components with distinct-at times, even
> antagonistic-properties.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 942-950 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800023
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Psychometric Properties of the Wender-Reimherr Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Scale
>
> Authors:
> Marchant, BK; Reimherr, FW; Robison, D; Robison, RJ; Wender, PH
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):942-950; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Wender-Reimherr Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Scale (WRAADDS;
> Wender, 1995) is a clinician-rated scale based on the Utah Criteria for
> attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. It assesses
> ADHD symptom severity across 7 domains: attention difficulties,
> hyperactivity/restlessness, temper, affective lability, emotional
> over-reactivity, disorganization, and impulsivity. The normative sample
> consisted of 120 males and females ages 20-49 with no personal or family
> history of ADHD. Patients with ADHD met Diagnostic and Statistical
> Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American
> Psychiatric Association, 2000) criteria, included males and females ages
> 20-60, and came from 5 clinical trials. Measures of reliability
> (test-retest r = .96; interrater r = .75) and internal consistency
> (Cronbach's alpha = 0.78) were acceptable. The WRAADDS correlated with
> the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS; Conners, Erhardt, &
> Sparrow, 1999) total scores (r = .501, p < .001). WRAADDS hyperactivity
> + impulsivity correlated with the CAARS hyperactivity/impulsivity (r =
> .601, p < .001), and WRAADDS attention + disorganization correlated with
> the CAARS inattention (r = .430, p < .001). Discriminate validity
> (adults with vs. without ADHD) was significant for all domains (p <
> .001). Factor analysis yielded a 2-factor solution accounting for 58% of
> the variance, one containing the emotional dimensions and the second
> containing attention and disorganization. Hyperactivity/restlessness and
> impulsivity were split between both factors. Changes in response to
> treatment for the WRAADDS and CAARS were highly correlated (p < .001).
> These psychometric data support continued use of the WRAADDS in adults
> with ADHD.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 951-965 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800024
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Validation of and Revision to the VRAG and SORAG: The Violence Risk Appraisal Guide-Revised (VRAG-R)
>
> Authors:
> Rice, ME; Harris, GT; Lang, C
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):951-965; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) was developed in the early
> 1990s, and approximately 60 replications around the world have shown its
> utility for the appraisal of violence risk among correctional and
> psychiatric populations. At the same time, authorities (e.g., Dawes,
> Faust, & Meehl, 1989) have argued that tools should be periodically
> evaluated to see if they need to be revised. In the present study, we
> evaluated the accuracy of the VRAG in a sample of 1,261 offenders, fewer
> than half of whom were participants in the development sample, then
> developed and validated a revised and easier-to-score instrument (the
> VRAG-R). We examined the accuracy of both instruments over fixed
> durations of opportunity ranging from 6 months to 49 years and examined
> outcome measures pertaining to the overall number, severity, and
> imminence of violent recidivism. Both instruments were found to predict
> dichotomous violent recidivism overall and at various fixed follow-ups
> with high levels of predictive accuracy (receiver operating
> characteristic areas of approximately .75) and to significantly predict
> other violent outcomes.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 966-978 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800025
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Distinguishing Primary and Secondary Variants of Callous-Unemotional Traits Among Adolescents in a Clinic-Referred Sample
>
> Authors:
> Kahn, RE; Frick, PJ; Youngstrom, EA; Youngstrom, JK; Feeny, NC;
> Findling, RL
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):966-978; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The current study used model-based cluster analyses to determine if
> there are 2 distinct variants of adolescents (ages 11-18) high on
> callous-unemotional (CU) traits that differ on their level of anxiety
> and history of trauma. The sample (n = 272) consisted of clinic-referred
> youths who were primarily African American (90%) and who came from
> low-income families. Consistent with hypotheses, 3 clusters emerged,
> including a group low on CU traits, as well as 2 groups high on CU
> traits that differed in their level of anxiety and past trauma.
> Consistent with past research on incarcerated adults and adolescents,
> the group high on anxiety (i.e., secondary variant) was more likely to
> have histories of abuse and had higher levels of impulsivity,
> externalizing behaviors, aggression, and behavioral activation. In
> contrast, the group low on anxiety (i.e., primary variant) scored lower
> on a measure of behavioral inhibition. On measures of impulsivity and
> externalizing behavior, the higher scores for the secondary cluster were
> found only for self-report measures, not on parent-report measures.
> Youths in the primary cluster also were perceived as less credible
> reporters than youths in the secondary cluster (i.e., secondary variant)
> or cluster low on CU traits. These reporter and credibility differences
> suggest that adolescents within the primary variant may underreport
> their level of behavioral disturbance, which has important assessment
> implications.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 979-990 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800026
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Tracking Change Through Treatment With the Inventory of Offender Risk, Needs, and Strengths
>
> Authors:
> Bergeron, CL; Miller, HA
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):979-990; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Dynamic risk variables (or criminogenic needs; Andrews & Bonta, 2003)
> increase risk for criminal behavior and are conceptualized as changeable
> through intervention. Yet this assumption of changeability has been
> examined in only a few studies, and none of these studies have examined
> whether the measurement properties the risk assessments measure remain
> invariant over time-a necessary precursor to determining if actual
> change is occurring or if changes in measurement are producing
> differences. This study examines the Dynamic Needs Index (DNI) and
> Protective Strengths Index (PSI) of the Inventory of Offender Risk,
> Needs, and Strengths (Miller, 2006b) pre- and post-treatment. Findings
> suggest the measurement properties of the DNI are acceptably invariant
> over time, although there is evidence that the intercept of the
> Alcohol/Drug Problems scale is higher after (opposed to before)
> treatment and the intercept of the Intra/Interpersonal Problems scale is
> higher before treatment. Subsequent latent difference score models
> suggest-as expected-that the Dynamic Needs latent variable decreased and
> the Protective Strengths latent variable increased through treatment.
> This study presents first evidence for invariance of measurement
> properties of a risk assessment measure at different points in
> treatment.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 991-996 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800027
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Does Cynicism Play a Role in Failure to Obtain Needed Care? Mental Health Service Utilization Among Returning US National Guard Soldiers
>
> Authors:
> Arbisi, PA; Rusch, L; Polusny, MA; Thuras, P; Erbes, CR
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):991-996; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> In the present study, the authors examined cynicism, a trait associated
> with mistrust and a misanthropic world view, as an impediment to seeking
> needed mental health services among a group of National Guard Soldiers
> with diagnoses of anxiety, depression, or substance abuse or dependence
> after a combat deployment. On their return from deployment, 40 National
> Guard soldiers were assessed for self-stigma, current distress,
> attitudes toward mental health care, and psychiatric diagnoses. Eight
> and a half months later, mental health service utilization was
> evaluated. Cynicism assessed prior to deployment was associated with
> lower odds of utilizing mental health services independent of
> self-stigma and negative attitudes toward mental health care. Further,
> neither self-stigma nor attitudes toward mental health care predicted
> engaging in needed mental health care when cynicism was included in the
> model.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 997-1001 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800028
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Smokeless Tobacco Expectancies Scale (STES)
>
> Authors:
> Gottlieb, JC; Cohen, LM; DeMarree, KG; Treloar, HR; McCarthy, DM
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):997-1001; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Expectancies regarding the effects of various psychoactive substances
> are important predictors of the initiation and maintenance of substance
> use. Although measures of outcome expectancies exist for several
> addictive substances, there is currently no measure to assess smokeless
> tobacco (ST) expectancies in an adult population. This article presents
> 2 studies leading to the development and psychometric evaluation of the
> Smokeless Tobacco Expectancies Scale (STES). Initially, 155 individuals
> listed all outcomes they expected to occur if they were to use ST
> products. From these responses, an initial pool of potential STES items
> was identified. The STES was then administered to 2 samples totaling 813
> individuals (265 ST users, 270 cigarette smokers, and 278 nontobacco
> users). The first study included 315 participants who completed a
> 68-item measure. An exploratory factor analysis identified 10 items that
> may account for individuals' ST expectancies. Items loaded on 2 factors:
> Negative Health Consequences and Positive Reinforcement. A confirmatory
> factor analysis on an independent sample (n = 498) supported the
> proposed factor structure. Furthermore, in both samples, the STES
> accurately discriminated ST users from smokers and nonusers. Findings
> are discussed in terms of the potential uses of the STES for advancing
> the understanding of ST use.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 1002-1006 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800029
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Estimating the Severity of Intellectual Disability in Adults: A Mokken Scaling Analysis of the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire
>
> Authors:
> Murray, AL; McKenzie, K
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):1002-1006; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> A Mokken scaling analysis of the Learning Disability Screening
> Questionnaire (LDSQ) suggested that, with the exception of 1 item, the
> scale conforms to the properties of a Mokken scale. This has advantages
> for estimating the severity of intellectual disability and inferring the
> difficulties likely to be experienced by an individual for whom there is
> incomplete information on intellectual and adaptive functioning.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 1007-1012 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800030
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Personality Assessment in a Diverse Urban Sample
>
> Authors:
> Sutin, AR; Costa, PT; Evans, MK; Zonderman, AB
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):1007-1012; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> In the present research, the authors examined the data quality and
> replicability of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) factor
> structure in a sample that varied in ethnicity, socioeconomic status,
> and literacy. Participants (N = 546), drawn from the Healthy Aging in
> Neighborhoods of Diversity Across the Life Span study, were African
> American (58%) and White (42%) urban dwellers living above (49%) and
> below (51%) 125% of the federal poverty line. The NEO-PI-R, administered
> via telephone, was evaluated for data quality (percent valid,
> acquiescence, internal consistency), congruence with the normative
> factor structure, and readability. All indices of data quality and
> factor congruence were excellent in the full sample. Literacy was the
> most consistent predictor of data quality. A slightly worse structure
> was found for the Openness to Experience and Extraversion factors among
> lower socioeconomic status African American and White participants. The
> overall index of factor congruence, however, supports replication of the
> normative structure well beyond chance levels even among those with
> lower literacy. Despite the challenges of low literacy, the present
> findings indicate that personality traits can be assessed reliably in
> socioeconomically diverse populations that include those living in
> poverty.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 1013-1018 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800031
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Psychometric Properties of the Functions and Addictive Features Scales of the Ottawa Self-Injury Inventory: A Preliminary Investigation Using a University Sample
>
> Authors:
> Martin, J; Cloutier, PF; Levesque, C; Bureau, JF; Lafontaine, MF; Nixon,
> MK
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):1013-1018; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is an issue primarily of concern in
> adolescents and young adults. Thus far, no single NSSI self-report
> measure offers a fully comprehensive assessment of NSSI, particularly
> including measurement of both its functions and potential addictive
> features. The Ottawa Self-Injury Inventory (ORE) permits simultaneous
> assessment of both these characteristics; the current study examined the
> psychometric properties of this measure in a sample of 149 young adults
> in a university student sample (82.6% girls, M-age = 19.43 years).
> Exploratory factor analyses revealed 4 functions factors (internal
> emotion regulation, social influence, external emotion regulation, and
> sensation seeking) and a single addictive features factor. Convergent
> evidence for the functions factor scores was demonstrated through
> significant correlations with an existing measure of NSSI functions and
> indicators of psychological well-being, risky behaviors, and context and
> frequency of NSSI behaviors. Convergent evidence was also shown for the
> addictive features scores, through associations with NSSI frequency,
> feeling relieved following NSSI, and inability to resist NSSI urges.
> Additional comment is made regarding the potential for addictive
> features of NSSI to be both negatively and positively reinforcing.
> Results show preliminary psychometric support for the OSI as a valid and
> reliable assessment tool to be used in both research and clinical
> contexts. The OSI can provide important information for case formulation
> and treatment planning, given the comprehensive and all-inclusive nature
> of its assessment capacities.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 1019-1024 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800032
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Interpreting Multiple Risk Scales for Sex Offenders: Evidence for Averaging
>
> Authors:
> Lehmann, RJB; Hanson, RK; Babchishin, KM; Gallasch-Nemitz, F;
> Biedermann, J; Dahle, KP
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):1019-1024; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> This study tested 3 decision rules for combining actuarial risk
> instruments for sex offenders into an overall evaluation of risk. Based
> on a 9-year follow-up of 940 adult male sex offenders, we found that
> Rapid Risk Assessment for Sex Offender Recidivism (RRASOR), Static-99R,
> and Static-2002R predicted sexual, violent, and general recidivism and
> provided incremental information for the prediction of all 3 outcomes.
> Consistent with previous findings, the incremental effect of RRASOR was
> positive for sexual recidivism but negative for violent and general
> recidivism. Averaging risk ratios was a promising approach to combining
> these risk scales, showing good calibration between predicted (E) and
> observed (O) recidivism rates (E/O index = 0.93, 95% CI [0.79, 1.09])
> and good discrimination (area under the curve = 0.73, 95% CI [0.69,
> 0.77]) for sexual recidivism. As expected, choosing the lowest (least
> risky) risk tool resulted in underestimated sexual recidivism rates (E/O
> = 0.67, 95% CI [0.57, 0.79]) and choosing the highest (riskiest)
> resulted in overestimated risk (E/O = 1.37, 95% CI [1.17, 1.60]). For
> the prediction of violent and general recidivism, the combination rules
> provided similar or lower discrimination compared with relying solely on
> the Static-99R or Static-2002R. The current results support an averaging
> approach and underscore the importance of understanding the constructs
> assessed by violence risk measures.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 1025-1031 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800033
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> The Child PTSD Symptom Scale: An Update and Replication of Its Psychometric Properties
>
> Authors:
> Nixon, RDV; Meiser-Stedman, R; Dalgleish, T; Yule, W; Clark, DM; Perrin,
> S; Smith, P
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):1025-1031; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The psychometric properties of the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) were
> examined in 2 samples. Sample 1 (N = 185, ages 6-17 years) consisted of
> children recruited from hospitals after accidental injury, assault, and
> road traffic trauma, and assessed 6 months posttrauma. Sample 2 (N = 68,
> ages 6-17 years) comprised treatment-seeking children who had
> experienced diverse traumas. In both samples psychometric properties
> were generally good to very good (internal reliability for total CPSS
> scores = .83 and .90, respectively). The point-biserial correlation of
> the CPSS with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis derived
> from structured clinical interview was .51, and children diagnosed with
> PTSD reported significantly higher symptoms than non-FTSD children. The
> CPSS demonstrated applicability to be used as a diagnostic measure,
> demonstrating sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 72%. The performance
> of the CPSS Symptom Severity Scale to accurately identify PTSD at
> varying cutoffs is reported in both samples, with a score of 16 or above
> suggested as a revised cutoff.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 1032-1036 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800034
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Operating Characteristics of the PTSD Checklist in a Military Primary Care Setting
>
> Authors:
> Gore, KL; McCutchan, PK; Prins, A; Freed, MC; Liu, X; Weil, JM; Engel,
> CC
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):1032-1036; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> The Department of Defense (DoD) is implementing universal behavioral
> health screening for all DoD health-care beneficiaries presenting to
> military primary care clinics. The PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version
> (PCL-C; Weathers, Litz, Herman, Huska, & Keane, 1993) is used for the
> identification of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, the
> operating characteristics of the PCL-C remain unstudied in this
> population. This study examined the operating characteristics of the
> PCL-C in a sample of 213 patients from 3 Washington, D.C., area military
> primary care clinics. Blinded raters independently assessed PTSD using
> the PTSD Symptom Scale Interview (Foa, Riggs, Dancu, & Rothbaum, 1993)
> as the diagnostic criterion standard. The receiver operating
> characteristic curve revealed that PCL-C scores accounted for 92% of the
> area under the curve. A PCL-C score of 31 optimized sensitivity (0.93)
> and specificity (0.90), and the multilevel likelihood ratio was 5.50
> (95% confidence interval [2.26, 13.37]). Internal consistency (0.97) and
> test-retest reliability (0.87 after a median 13 days) were strong.
> Results suggest that a PCL-C score of 31 is the optimal cutoff score for
> use in a military primary care setting serving active duty service
> members, dependents, and retirees. These findings offer military primary
> care providers preliminary data to interpret PCL-C scores and to inform
> treatment decisions as part of routine clinical practice.
>
> ========================================================================
>
>
> *Pages: 1037-1043 (Article)
> *View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000323994800035
> *Order Full Text [ ]
>
> Title:
> Psychophysiological Assessment of PTSD: A Potential Research Domain Criteria Construct
>
> Authors:
> Bauer, MR; Ruef, AM; Pineles, SL; Japuntich, SJ; Macklin, ML; Lasko, NB;
> Orr, SP
>
> Source:
> *PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT*, 25 (3):1037-1043; SEP 2013
>
> Abstract:
> Most research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) relies on
> clinician-administered interview and self-report measures to establish
> the presence/absence and severity of the disorder. Accurate diagnosis of
> PTSD is made challenging by the presence of symptoms shared with other
> psychopathologies and the subjective nature of patients' descriptions of
> their symptoms. A physiological assessment capable of reliably
> "diagnosing" PTSD could provide adjunctive information that might
> mitigate these diagnostic limitations. In the present study, we examined
> the construct validity of a potential psychophysiological measure of
> PTSD, that is, psychophysiological reactivity to script-driven imagery
> (SDI-PR), as measured against the current diagnostic "gold-standard" for
> PTSD, the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Convergent and
> predictive validity and stability were examined. Thirty-six individuals
> completed an SDI-PR procedure, the CAPS, and self-report measures of
> mental and physical health at their initial visit and approximately 6
> months later. SDI PR and the CAPS demonstrated excellent stability
> across measurement occasions. SDI PR showed moderately strong convergent
> validity with the CAPS. After adjusting for self-reported depression,
> predictive validity for the CAPS, with regard to health sequelae, was
> reduced, whereas it remained mostly unchanged for SDI-PR. Findings
> support SDI-PR as a valid and stable measure of PTSD that captures a
> pathophysiologic process in individuals with PTSD. Results are discussed
> with regard to the research domain criteria framework.
>
>