Tuesday, January 31, 2012

test post--ignore





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Current Directions in Psychological Science Table of Contents for 1 February 2012; Vol. 21, No. 1

Current Directions in Psychological Science Online Table of Contents Alert

A new issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science is available online:
1 February 2012; Vol. 21, No. 1

The below Table of Contents is available online at: http://cdp.sagepub.com/content/vol21/issue1/?etoc


Articles
Identifying and Remediating Failures of Selective Attention in Older Drivers
Alexander Pollatsek, Matthew R. E. Romoser, and Donald L. Fisher
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 3-7
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/3

The Nature and Organization of Individual Differences in Executive Functions: Four General Conclusions
Akira Miyake and Naomi P. Friedman
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 8-14
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/8

GLOMOsys: The How and Why of Global and Local Processing
Jens Förster
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 15-19
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/15

Self-Control and Aggression
Thomas F. Denson, C. Nathan DeWall, and Eli J. Finkel
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 20-25
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/20

Risky Decisions: Active Risk Management
Oswald Huber
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 26-30
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/26

Beyond Comprehension: The Role of Numeracy in Judgments and Decisions
Ellen Peters
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 31-35
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/31

Risk and Reward Are Processed Differently in Decisions Made Under Stress
Mara Mather and Nichole R. Lighthall
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 36-41
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/36

Broken Hearts and Broken Bones: A Neural Perspective on the Similarities Between Social and Physical Pain
Naomi I. Eisenberger
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 42-47
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/42

Dissociation and Dissociative Disorders: Challenging Conventional Wisdom
Steven Jay Lynn, Scott O. Lilienfeld, Harald Merckelbach, Timo Giesbrecht, and Dalena van der Kloet
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 48-53
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/48

Motivational Salience: Amygdala Tuning From Traits, Needs, Values, and Goals
William A. Cunningham and Tobias Brosch
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 54-59
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/54

Patients' Perceptions of Their Illness: The Dynamo of Volition in Health Care
Keith J. Petrie and John Weinman
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2012;21 60-65
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/1/60



Canadian WAIS-IV: New cognitive proficiency index scores now available


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New Cognitive Processing Index score now available for Canadian WAIS-IV

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Sunday, January 29, 2012

Friday, January 27, 2012

Article: High school whiz kids may face reading comprehension issues in university


High school whiz kids may face reading comprehension issues in university
http://www.psypost.org/2012/01/high-school-whiz-kids-may-face-reading-comprehension-issues-in-university-9466

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Research bytes: ADHD diagnosis--gender and adolescence

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Beyond IQ Series # 20: Self-regulated learning - Reaction and Reflection




This is the 20th installment in the Beyond IQ series. This installment defines the reaction and reflection phase of self-regulated learning. [All installments in this series (and other related posts and research) can be found by clicking here].

Reaction and Reflection: Conceptual Background and Definition

The metacognitive processes involved in self-judging and making causal attributions to personal performance.

The final SRL phase involves a student evaluating and judging their performance and making causal attributions for their performance. Students who do not self-evaluate their performance or who are not cognizant of the importance of self-evaluation, tend to engage in surface (vs deep) processing in learning and also tend to display more negative affect and lower effort (Pintrich, 2002). Taking time to reflect on one’s learning and learning processes is associated with more successful academic outcomes. Stated briefly, SRL reaction and reflection strategies are defined as a student’s self-judging their performance and making causal attributions for their performance.

Upon completion of an academic task, a student may reflect on the outcome and experience an affective reaction. If the outcome was successful goal attainment, happiness may result. Conversely, academic failure may produce anger or sadness. The specific causes the student attributes to their success or failure (causal attribution) are hypothesized to impact the development of future levels of motivational beliefs (e.g., academic self- efficacy, academic self- concept), and thus, future learning (Pintrich, 2000). Finally, a student’s thoughts about their behavior (e.g., amount of actual study time vs. planned study time) is important for SRL via the mechanism of choice. For example, “they may decide that procrastinating studying for an exam may not be the most adaptive behavior for academic achievement. In the future, they may decide to make a different choice in terms of their effort and time management” (Pintrich, 2000, p. 469).

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Dissertation Dish: CHC neurocognitive predictors of flying performance




Neurocognitive Predictors of Flight Performance of Successful Solo Flight Students by Emery, Brian, Ph.D., Northcentral University, 2011 , 362 pages; AAT 3489209

Abstract

Cognitive abilities have been identified as a significant source for determining the potential for individuals to achieve success as pilots. However, while assessments of specific cognitive abilities are considered critical to predicting pilot performance, they do not form part of university admission processes for students applying to flight programs, where attrition rates can be high as 70%. The Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) three-stratum model theory of cognitive abilities links academic and cognitive performance; however, further research could contribute to stratum modifications by expanding understanding of the relationships between CHC theory information processing abilities and specific human performance. In an independent-sample t test research design, this nonexperimental quantitative study examined the relationship between cognitive predictors and successful solo flight performance of student pilots. The CogScreen Aeromedical Edition neurological assessment was used to determine if cognitive factors are valid and reliable of successful solo flight performance. The study participants were 70 student pilots (a convenience sample) between the ages of 18 and 25, 10 female (14%) and 60 male (86%), selected from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. The CogScreen-AE measure was administered to the participants prior to their flight instruction. Flight instructors used the FA121 Flight Training Syllabus to evaluate student performance during their training. At the completion of the training, participants were placed in Solo-Completed ( n = 52) and Solo-Not-Completed ( n = 18) groups. Independent-sample t tests were used to compare the mean scores between the Solo-Completed and Solo-Not-Completed groups. The test was significant for the three cognitive measures: divided attention t (68) = 3.77, p < .001, speed-working memory t (68) = 6.81, p < .001, and LRPV t (68) = 17.67, p < .001. The Pearson correlation results revealed that LRPV ( r [52] = .32, p < .05) had the strongest relationship of the three cognitive measures. In addition, regression analyses revealed that the LRPV was the most predictive that explained 81% of the variance ( R ² = .81, F [1, 51] = 213.15, p < .001) in successful solo flight performance. These findings suggest that these cognitive measures are significant of successful solo flight performance and provide further evidence in support of the CHC theory. It is concluded that applying a cognitive performance measure prior to admission to a flight program may reduce attrition rates, support necessary accommodations, and identify flight deficiencies. Further research should compare results among different university flight programs to confirm the findings and to improve the reliability of the CogScreen-AE as a standardized measure for beginning flight students.



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Article: MIND Reviews: Thinking, Fast and Slow



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Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Article: Intelligence – Are You Holding Back Your Brain?

The story at the link below deals with the construct of academic ability conception which is included in the Model of Academic Competence and Motivation -- info at this link



Intelligence – Are You Holding Back Your Brain?
http://brainblogger.com/2012/01/24/intelligence-are-you-holding-back-your-brain/

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Article: Teachers pen book on technology, brain science



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Monday, January 23, 2012

Article: Dana Foundation Blog: Learning About Learning


Dana Foundation Blog: Learning About Learning
http://danapress.typepad.com/weblog/2012/01/learning-about-learning.html

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Book Nook: Contemporary Intellectual Assessment, Third Edition: Theories, Tests, and Issues




Hot of the press

Contemporary Intellectual Assessment, Third Edition: Theories, Tests, and Issues [Hardcover]. Dawn P. Flanagan PhD (Editor), Patti L. Harrison Phd (Editor)

I. The Origins of Intellectual Assessment

1. A History of Intelligence Assessment: The Unfinished Tapestry, John D. Wasserman

2. A History of Intelligence Test Interpretation, Randy W. Kamphaus, Anne Pierce Winsor, Ellen W. Rowe,and Sangwon Kim

II. Contemporary Theoretical Perspectives

3. Foundations for Better Understanding of Cognitive Abilities, John L. Horn and Nayena Blankson

4. The Cattell–Horn–Carroll (CHC) Model of Intelligence, W. Joel Schneider and Kevin S. McGrew

5. Assessment of Intellectual Profile: A Perspective from Multiple-Intelligences Theory, Jie-Qi Chen andHoward Gardner

6. The Triarchic Theory of Successful Intelligence, Robert J. Sternberg

7. Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, Successive (PASS): A Cognitive Processing–Based Theory of Intelligence, Jack A. Naglieri, J. P. Das, and Sam Goldstein

III. Contemporary Intelligence, Cognitive, and Neuropsychological Batteries (and Associated Achievement Tests)

8. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale–Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), Lisa Whipple Drozdick, Dustin Wahlstrom, Jianjun Zhu, and Lawrence G. Weiss

9. The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence–Third Edition (WPPSI–III), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–Fourth Edition (WISC–IV), and the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test–Third Edition (WIAT–III), Dustin Wahlstrom, Kristina C. Breaux, Jianjun Zhu, and Lawrence G. Weiss

10. The Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition (SB5), Gale H. Roid and Mark Pomplun

11. The Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children–Second Edition (KABC-II) and the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement–Second Edition (KTEA-II), Jennie Kaufman Singer, Elizabeth O. Lichtenberger, James C. Kaufman, Alan S. Kaufman, and Nadeen L. Kaufman

12. The Woodcock–Johnson III Normative Update (WJ III NU): Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement, Fredrick A. Schrank and Barbara J. Wendling

13. The Differential Ability Scales–Second Edition (DAS-II), Colin D. Elliott

14. The Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT): A Multidimensional Nonverbal Alternative for Cognitive Assessment, R. Steve McCallum and Bruce A. Bracken

15. The Cognitive Assessment System (CAS): From Theory to Practice, Jack A. Naglieri and Tulio M. Otero

16. The Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) and the Reynolds Intellectual Screening Test (RIST), Cecil R. Reynolds, Randy W. Kamphaus, and Tara C. Raines

17. The NEPSY-II, Robb N. Matthews, Cynthia A. Riccio, and John L. Davis

18. The Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability (WNV): Assessment of Diverse Populations, Jack A. Naglieriand Tulio M. Otero

IV. Contemporary Interpretive Approaches and Their Relevance for Intervention

19. The Cross-Battery Assessment (XBA) Approach: An Overview, Historical Perspective, and Current Directions, Dawn P. Flanagan, Vincent C. Alfonso, and Samuel O. Ortiz

20. Cognitive Hypothesis Testing (CHT): Linking Test Results to the Real World, Catherine A. Fiorello, James B. Hale, and Kirby L. Wycoff

21. Processing Approaches to Interpreting Information from Cognitive Ability Tests: A Critical Review,Randy G. Floyd and John H. Kranzler

22. Testing with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations: Moving beyond the Verbal–Performance Dichotomy into Evidence-Based Practice, Samuel O. Ortiz, Salvador Hector Ochoa, and Agnieszka M. Dynda

23. Linking Cognitive Abilities to Academic Interventions for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD), Nancy Mather and Barbara J. Wendling

V. Assessment of Intelligence and Cognitive Functioning in Different Populations

24. Cognitive Assessment in Early Childhood: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives, Laurie Ford, Michelle L. Kozey, and Juliana Negreiros

25. Use of Intelligence Tests in the Identification of Giftedness, David E. McIntosh, Felicia A. Dixon, andEric E. Pierson

26. Use of Ability Tests in the Identification of Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) within the Context of an Operational Definition, Dawn P. Flanagan, Vincent C. Alfonso, Jennifer T. Mascolo, and Marlene Sotelo-Dynega

27. Assessment of Intellectual Functioning in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Laura Grofer Klinger, Sarah E. O’Kelley, Joanna L. Mussey, Sam Goldstein, and Melissa DeVries

28. Cognitive and Neuropsychological Assessment of ADHD: Redefining a Disruptive Behavior Disorder,James B. Hale, Megan Yim, Andrea N. Schneider, Gabrielle Wilcox, Julie N. Henzel, and Shauna G. Dixon

29. Intellectual and Neuropsychological Assessment of Individuals with Sensory and Physical Disabilities and Traumatic Brain Injury, Scott L. Decker, Julia A. Englund, and Alycia M. Roberts

30. Use of Intelligence Tests in the Identification of Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD), Kathleen Armstrong, Jason Hangauer, and Joshua Nadeau

VI. Contemporary and Emerging Issues in Intellectual Assessment

31. Using Joint Test Standards to Evaluate the Validity Evidence for Intelligence Tests, Jeffery P. Bradenand Bradley C. Niebling

32. Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to Aid in Understanding the Constructs Measured by Intelligence Tests, Timothy Z. Keith and Matthew R. Reynolds

33: The Emergence of Neuropsychological Constructs into Tests of Intelligence and Cognitive Abilities,Daniel C. Miller and Denise E. Maricle

34. The Role of Cognitive and Intelligence Tests in the Assessment of Executive Functions, Denise E. Maricle and Erin Avirett

35. Intelligence Tests in the Context of Emerging Assessment Practices: Problem-Solving Applications,Rachel Brown-Chidsey and Kristina J. Andren

36. Intellectual, Cognitive, and Neuropsychological Assessment in Three-Tier Service Delivery Practices in Schools, George McCloskey, James Whitaker, Ryan Murphy, and Jane Rogers

Appendix. The Three-Stratum Theory of Cognitive Abilities, John B. Carroll




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Do sexually aroused men score higher on IQ tests? A matter of life or death




Thanks to Kevin Foley (again) for sending me a new Atkins MR/ID death penalty decision--Pizzuto v Blades (2012, Idaho). I have not read the entire decision, but one interesting point has been brought to my attention.

Pizzuto's lawyers argued that his 1996 IQ score may have been inflated due to the testing being conducted by a very attractive female psychometrician. We all know that some test-specific variables can impact the reliability and precision of an IQ score, but there is no research suggesting that a man can score close to 14 points higher simply to impress an attractive examiner. Nice try defense...but a swing and a miss.

As stated on page 30 of the decision, Pizzuto may have been motivated to perform better than he otherwise would have "because Dr. Beaver’s ‘very attractive' female psychometrician administered the test . . . . Based on this, he claims that it would be appropriate to decrease the 1996 score by nearly a standard deviation, or 14 points, due to the presence of an attractive test administrator.” [pg 30].


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Meta-analysis continues to confirm importance of phonemic awareness in reading...but...lets not overestimate the importance

Double click on image to enlarge the abstract.




Meta-analysis like this one are powerful studies that confirm the importance, in this case, for phonemic awareness (Ga-PC per CHC theory) for reading and dyslexia. However I believe that often the individual studies used as the bases of meta-analysis may overstate the importance of particular abilities due to the well-known problem of specification error in each studies design. I've blogged about this previously and won't take up bandwidth reiterating the importance of recognizing how specification error can cloud accurate interpretation of studies. The long and short of the issue is that manly reading and dyslexia studies during the past two decades have suffered from specification error....by only including indicators of the "hot and sexy" ability constructs in reading research and failing to include measures of known abilities that are also important in reading.

As a result of the "missing variable" problem, individual studies and, in this case, a meta-analysis of studies, most likely overstates the importance of the selected abilities analyzed...in this case phonemic awareness. For example, a recent synthesis by McGrew & Wendling (2010) demonstrated that other abilities often not included in the extant reading disability research (e.g., processing speed; associative memory; lexical knowledge) are important. If measures of these important reading-related abilities had been included in the studies summarized by this meta-analysis most likely the magnitude (effect sizes) of phonemic awareness would be lowered.

Yes...phonemic awareness (Ga-PC) is clearly important...but I caution readers to take the magnitude of the importance with a grain of salt as it is most likely somewhat less if all important reading-related variables had been included in the studies that are combined in this review



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Sunday, January 22, 2012

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Importance of self-regulation skills in kindergarten@anniemurphypaul, 1/19/12 9:00 AM

Annie Murphy Paul (@anniemurphypaul)
1/19/12 9:00 AM
BRILLIANT: Kids who've acquired self-regulation skills by kindergarten are 3x as likely to read well in third grade: ti.me/yEtwrJ


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Tuesday, January 17, 2012

WJ III cognitive test deficits--base rates of number of deficient tests

Kudos to Scott Decker, Joel Schneider and Brad Hale for the excellent article on how to estimate base rates for the number of deficient test scores (using various levels of standard score deficit criteria (e.g., SS <= 80; SS <=70) in the Woodcock-Johnson III (WJ III) Standard and Extended cognitive batteries (tests 1-14). Not surprisingly, they find that the number of relative weaknesses a person displays is most likely more than most clinicians would believe.

Of more practical significance is a series of smoothed figures they provide, by age, which would allow clinicians to determine the base rate significance of number of deviant WJ III cognitive tests (from primary 14 tests).

Conflict of interest disclosure - I am a coauthor of the WJ III

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Friday, January 13, 2012

How to estimate best IQ score if someone has taken multiple IQ tests: The psychometric magic of Dr. Joel Schneider

Dr. Joel Schneider has posted an excellent explanation on how to estimate a person's "true IQ score" when a person has taken multiple IQ tests at different times. Probably the most important take-away message is one should never calculated the simple arithmetic average. The median would be more appropriate, but Joel provides and even more psychometrically sound method and an Excel spreadhsheet for implementing his excellent logic and methods.



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Thursday, January 12, 2012

Blogging lite: On a REAL vacation...Jimmy Buffet?


Not having had a real vacation in years (all others have been tied to conferences or professional trips), the blogmaster is taking a REAL cruise vacation, with my lovely Lady Di, utill Jan 22.

I will not be blogging, or may be blogging lite (push FYI posts) from wherever the ship is at. Jimmy Buffet...here I come




I shall return.





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Article: Intelligence: New Findings And Theoretical Developments



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Article: IQ scores are malleable.



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Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Neural efficiency and general intelligence: Is it mental quickness or timing?




Today I made a post at IM-HOME discussing the neural efficiency = general intelligence hypothesis (Arthur Jensen) where I make the case that recent research suggests that temporal or timing g (the internal brain clock) is a more fundamental cause of neural efficiency than the dominant Jensen reaction time g hypothesis. Check it out.

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Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman - Review - Significance Magazine

http://www.significancemagazine.org/details/review/1392103/Thinking-Fast-and-Slow-by-Daniel-Kahneman.html#.Tw25cFSqsUA.mailto


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Research byte: The Flynn Effect in South Africa

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Research byte: Flynn effect holds for the brightest also

Click on image to enlarge. This study will be added to the Flynn Effect Archive Project on the next update.


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Sijtsma on the "Future of Psychometrics: Ask what psychometrics can do for psychology"

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Research byte: Can fast and slow intelligence be measured differentially

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Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Article: More Left Brain / Right Brain Nonsense



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Article: STUDY ALERT: How Smart Do You Think You Are?



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Coalition for DSM-5 reform call for independent reviews and letters




The Coalition for DSM-5 has announced an open letter campaign to solicit independent reviews and feedback regarding DSM-5. - Posted using BlogPress from Kevin McGrew's iPad

Article: Could an iTunes-like model work with scientific publishing? : Discovering Biology in a Digital World


Could an iTunes-like model work with scientific publishing? : Discovering Biology in a Digital World
http://scienceblogs.com/digitalbio/2012/01/could_an_itunes-like_model_wor.php

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Article: Guidelines for the evaluation of dementia and age-related cognitive change.


Guidelines for the evaluation of dementia and age-related cognitive change.
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/amp/67/1/1

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Article: Guidelines for assessment of and intervention with persons with disabilities.


Guidelines for assessment of and intervention with persons with disabilities.
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/amp/67/1/43

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Sunday, January 08, 2012

Article: Christmas brain lectures available worldwide



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Psychometrika, Vol. 77, Issue 1 - New Issue Alert

For my fellow quantoid readers



Sunday, January 8

Dear Valued Customer,
We are pleased to deliver your requested table of contents alert for Psychometrika. Volume 77 Number 1 is now available on SpringerLink

Register for Springer's email services providing you with info on the latest books in your field. ... More!
In this issue:
Acknowledgments
Abstract    Full text PDF

Acknowledgements
Abstract    Full text PDF

Future of Psychometrics: Ask What Psychometrics Can Do for Psychology
Klaas Sijtsma
Abstract    Full text PDF

On Compensation in Multidimensional Response Modeling
Wim J. van der Linden
Abstract    Full text PDF

A flexible latent trait model for response times in tests
Jochen Ranger & Jorg-Tobias Kuhn
Abstract    Full text PDF

Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis
Heungsun Hwang, Kwanghee Jung, Yoshio Takane & Todd S. Woodward
Abstract    Full text PDF

Moment Testing for Interaction Terms in Structural Equation Modeling
Ab Mooijaart & Albert Satorra
Abstract    Full text PDF

The CLASSI-N Method for the Study of Sequential Processes
Eva Vande Gaer, Eva Ceulemans, Iven Van Mechelen & Peter Kuppens
Abstract    Full text PDF

Likelihood-Based Clustering of Meta-Analytic SROC Curves
Heinz Holling, Walailuck Böhning & Dankmar Böhning
Abstract    Full text PDF

Generalizations of Paradoxical Results in Multidimensional Item Response Theory
Pascal Jordan & Martin Spiess
Abstract    Full text PDF

A Note on the Reliability Coefficients for Item Response Model-Based Ability Estimates
Seonghoon Kim
Abstract    Full text PDF

On the Relationships Between Jeffreys Modal and Weighted Likelihood Estimation of Ability Under Logistic IRT Models
David Magis & Gilles Raîche
Abstract    Full text PDF

Program of the 76th Annual and 17th International Meeting of the Psychometric Society
Abstract    Full text PDF

Minutes of the Psychometric Society Business Meeting, Room B4-LP-04, Hong Institute of Education, Hong Kong. July 22, 2011
Abstract    Full text PDF

Report of the Treasurer of the Psychometric Society
Abstract    Full text PDF

Index for Volume 76
Abstract    Full text PDF
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